What is Hashimoto’s Thyroiditis?

Hashimoto’s Thyroiditis

Hashimoto thyroiditis is the most common form of thyroid gland inflammation (thyroiditis) and the most frequent cause of decreased thyroid hormone production hypothyroidism. It results from an autoimmune disorder, an attack on the thyroid gland by a person’s own immune system.
The thyroid gland is a butterfly-shaped organ that lies flat against the windpipe in the throat. It produces the hormones thyroxine (T4) and triiodothyronine (T3) and plays an important role in controlling the body’s metabolism.
With Hashimoto thyroiditis, the thyroid becomes enlarged, called a goiter. Thyroid gland tissue is slowly destroyed by white blood cells called lymphocytes that move into the thyroid gland and by one or more thyroid autoantibodies. This causes a progressive decrease in the production of thyroid hormones.
About 1 in 1,000 people are diagnosed annually with Hashimoto thyroiditis, and the number has been increasing over time due to improvements in diagnostic techniques. This disorder can affect anyone at any age but occurs most commonly in women who are between 30 and 50 years of age. The ratio of women to men diagnosed with the disease is 20 to 1. People with a family history of thyroid diseases or with other autoimmune diseases, especially type 1 diabetes or adrenal insufficiency are at increased risk.
Those affected by Hashimoto thyroiditis may not have any symptoms for several years, but eventually most will experience some degree of hypothyroidism that worsens over time.

Signs and Symptoms
Constipation
Depression
Dry skin
Fatigue
Forgetfulness
Increased sensitivity to cold
Menstrual irregularities, heavy and excessive bleeding
Muscle and joint pain
Muscle weakness
Sluggishness
Thinning hair
Weight gain
For pregnant women, increased risk of miscarriage

Tests
Testing is done to evaluate the health of the thyroid, diagnose Hashimoto thyroiditis, and monitor treatment.
To determine whether the thyroid is functioning properly and for monitoring thyroid function and hormone production, one or more of the following blood tests may be done:
Thyroid-stimulating hormone (TSH) – typically elevated in hypothyroidism
Free T4 – often decreased in primary hypothyroidism
Total or Free T3 – sometimes decreased but may be within the normal reference range, so is not as useful as free T4
Additional tests may be used to detect autoantibodies directed against the thyroid and to help diagnose Hashimoto thyroiditis:
Anti-thyroid peroxidase antibody (anti-TPO, see Thyroid Antibodies) – this test detects the presence of autoantibodies against a protein found in thyroid cells. A high value usually indicates autoimmune damage to the thyroid due to disorders such as Hashimoto thyroiditis and Graves disease.
Antithyroglobulin antibody (TgAb) – if positive, may indicate Hashimoto thyroiditis; while thyroglobulin antibodies are often positive, they are not as sensitive or specificas anti-TPO so they are not routinely ordered.
People with a very mild form of Hashimoto thyroiditis may not have thyroid antibodies present in their blood.
Treatment
There is no cure for Hashimoto thyroiditis, but the disorder is manageable. No treatment is required when thyroid hormone concentrations (T4 and T3) are normal and the affected person is not experiencing significant symptoms. Thyroid hormone replacement therapy is typically necessary, however, when thyroid hormone production becomes significantly decreased and symptoms begin to emerge or worsen. Those with Hashimoto thyroiditis are closely monitored, and thyroid hormone replacement therapy is initiated and/or adjusted as necessary.

https://medlineplus.gov/ency/article/000371.htm

Selenium for your Thyroid Health

Selenium Health Benefits and the Best sources

Do you have an under active Thyroid? Are you getting the vitamins and minerals needed to support the process?  Here is some info on why Selenium is important to the process.  Soaking your nuts and seeds for best absorption will help your already stressed out body.

Antioxidant Protection
Selenium is required for the proper activity of a group of enzymes called glutathione peroxidases. (sometimes abbreviated “GPO” or “GPx” for a glutathione peroxidase enzyme.) These enzymes play a key role in the body’s detoxification system and they also provide protection against oxidative stress. (Oxidative stress is physiological circumstance in which there is excessive risk of oxygen-related damage to the body.) Of the eight known glutathione peroxidase enzymes, five of them require selenium.
In addition to the activity of glutathione peroxidase, selenium-containing enzymes are involved in recycling of vitamin C from its spent form back to its active one, allowing for greater antioxidant protection.

Support Normal Thyroid Function
A selenium-containing enzyme is responsible for transforming a less active thyroid hormone called T4 into the more active T3. As you’ll see below in the Relationship with Other Nutrients section, selenium and iodine work together to keep thyroid function strong and consistent.
Like the antioxidant protection issue, this is not just an esoteric concern. Researchers have been able to induce problems with the thyroid gland in just two months of a low-selenium diet.
Probably, if you’ve read about food sources of selenium, you’ve read about Brazil nuts as a strong source of the mineral. Depending on where they are grown, this is likely to be true—one ounce of Brazil nuts may contain as much as 10 times the Dietary Reference Intake (DRI) recommendation for selenium intake.
Other exceptionally selenium-rich foods include oysters, clams, liver, and kidney. Each of these foods is likely to contain double to triple the DRI in a serving.
Fish and shellfish make up an outsized proportion of our excellent and very good sources. After these come other animal meats, many of which fall in the very good category. Close behind are whole grains and seeds, both of which are well-represented in our good selenium sources category.
http://whfoods.org/genpage.php?tname=newtip&dbid=144&utm_source=daily_click&utm_medium=email&utm_campaign=daily_email

Polyphenol Nutrients-Multi Vitamin for Male/Females

Polyphenol Nutrients
Pure Encapsulations
120 capsules $48.80
360 capsules $82.10

Now with Metafolin® L-5-MTHF Powerful polyphenol-rich multivitamin and multimineral formula with additional protection factors *Packed with flavonoids and phenolic compounds from a unique blend of olive fruit, grape seed, pomegranate, green tea, quercetin and blueberry, this formula offers powerful overall cellular protection. It also contains the protective nutrients alpha lipoic acid, NAC, inositol and choline to complement the neural, cognitive, cardiovascular, liver and skin health properties of this diverse profile. Furthermore, Polyphenol Nutrients provides the advanced mineral delivery systems and active vitamin cofactors found in Nutrient 950® and UltraNutrient® for optimal bioavailability and utilization. As part of a well-balanced diet that is low in saturated fat and cholesterol, folic acid, vitamin B6 and vitamin B12 may reduce the risk of vascular disease.† †FDA evaluated the above claim and found that while it is known that diets low in saturated fats and cholesterol reduce the risk of heart disease and other vascular diseases, the evidence in support of the above claim is inconclusive. Polyphenol Nutrients is a nutrient dense multivitamin and mineral formula enhanced with an exceptional combination of polyphenols and specialized compounds for extensive physiological protection.
Servings Per Container: 30
Take 4–6 capsules per day, in divided doses, with meals.
Serving Size: 6 vegetable capsules
Amount Per Serving
vitamin A … 7, 500IU 
(as beta carotene)
vitamin C … 500mg 
(as ascorbic acid)
vitamin D … 800IU 
(as cholecalciferol)(D3)
vitamin E … 100IU 
(as d-alpha tocopherol succinate)
thiamin … 50mg 
(as thiamin HCl)(B1)
riboflavin … 25mg 
(vitamin B2)
niacin … 75mg 
(as niacin and 67% niacinamide)
vitamin B6 … 12.5mg 
(as pyridoxine HCl)
folate … 800mcg 
(as Metafolin®, L-5-MTHF)
vitamin B12 … 500mcg 
(as methylcobalamin)
biotin … 800mcg
pantothenic acid … 50mg 
(as calcium pantothenate)(B5)
calcium … 300mg 
(as calcium citrate)
iodine … 200mcg 
(as potassium iodide)
magnesium … 150mg 
(as magnesium citrate)
zinc … 15mg 
(as zinc picolinate)
selenium … 200mcg 
(as selenomethionine)
copper … 2mg 
(as copper glycinate)
manganese … 5mg 
(as manganese aspartate)
chromium … 100mcg 
(as chromium polynicotinate)
molybdenum … 100mcg 
(as molybdenum aspartate)
potassium … 99mg 
(as potassium aspartate)
boron … 2mg 
(as boron glycinate)
vanadium … 100mcg 
(as vanadium aspartate)
ascorbyl palmitate … 120mg 
(fat-soluble vitamin C)
riboflavin 5phosphate … 12.5mg 
(activated B2)
pyridoxal 5 phosphate … 12.5mg 
(activated B6)
mixed carotenoids … 425mcg 
(as lutein, lycopene, zeaxanthin)
n-acetyl-l-cysteine … 100mg 
(free-form)
choline bitartrate … 100mg
inositol … 125mg
alpha lipoic acid … 100mg 
(thioctic acid)
MacularSynergy Complex
lutein … 6mg
zeaxanthin … 1mg
CellHealth Polyphenols
quercetin … 50mg
blueberry extract … 100mg
(Vaccinium angustifolium)(fruit)
(standardized to contain 1.5% anthocyanins)1.5 mg.
olive extract … 50mg
(Olea europaea l.)(fruit)
(standardized to provide 1% hydroxytyrosol)
pomegranate extract … 100mg
(Punica granatum l.)(fruit)
(standardized to contain 5% ellagic acid)5 mg.
grape extract … 50mg
(Vitis vinifera)(seed)
(standardized to contain 92% polyphenols)
green tea extract … 100mg
(camellia sinensis)(leaf)
(standardized to contain 65% total tea catechins, 23% epigallocatechin (EGCG))
other ingredients: vegetarian capsule (cellulose, water)
If pregnant or lactating, consult your physician before taking this product. In rare cases, alpha lipoic acid may cause skin rash or hypoglycemia. Individuals who are sensitive may experience heartburn. Rare side effects of NAC may include nausea, vomiting, headache, dry mouth, dizziness, or abdominal pain. Large doses of choline may cause nausea, diarrhea or dizziness.
Polyphenol nutrients contains vitamin E and grape seed extract which may react with blood thinning and other heart medications. Green tea extract may interfere with the absorption and effectiveness of a number of medications including certain heart, blood thinning, antidiarrheal, and cold or hay fever medications. Consult your physician for more information.
FloraGlo lutein is a registered trademark of Kemin Industries, Inc. Zeaxanthin is sourced from OPTISHARP™ brand. OPTISHARP™ is a trademark of DSM Nutritional Products, Inc. Metafolin® is a registered Trademark of Merck KGaA, Darmstadt, Germany.

Chocolate Cooking Class info & Recipes

Cooking Class 2.12.2017
Chocolate Info

Cacao can fuel energy and mood. It is an excellent source of fiber good source of protein and iron. It is high in antioxidants and polyphenols. A half half a cup of raw organic cocoa powder has 110 cal, 2 g of fat 16 carbohydrates, 10 of which is dietary fiber. It contains 8 g of protein and will give you 10% of the iron you need for your daily requirements. It is considered a stimulant and should be eaten occasionally not every day.

Cocoa beans are the fermented seeds of the cacao tree. The fruit of the cocoa tree is a pod full of sweet pulp enfolding a cluster of about 20-40 cacao seeds. Cocoa refers to the low-fat constituent of the finely ground cacao beans. These ground beans, known as cocoa liquor or cocoa mass, also contains cocoa butter which is a non-dairy, naturally occurring fat. Cocoa butter is a mixture of monounsaturated fats like oleic acid and saturated fats, namely stearic acid and palmitic acid. About 50-60% of cocoa liquor consists of cocoa butter.

Cacao bark, butter and flowers have also been valued since ancient times for treating various diseases like skin ailments, bowel malfunction and wounds. Cocoa has anti-inflammatory, anti-allergenic, anti-carcinogenic and antioxidant qualities. Health benefits include relief from high blood pressure, cholesterol, obesity, constipation, diabetes, bronchial asthma, cancer, Chronic fatigue syndrome and various neurodegenerative diseases. It helps to improve cardiovascular health and brain health. It also helps in treating copper deficiency.

Commercially available chocolates and cocoa-products may not be rich in the original beneficial flavonols since their properties get destroyed by over-processing and heat. In order to obtain the benefits of cocoa, it is important to consume the correct source of cocoa. Milk/dairy blocks the absorption of the antioxidants in chocolate, so be sure to check the labels!

Antioxidant Capacity: Studies have shown it is evident that cocoa exhibits higher antioxidant activity than against green and black tea, and red wine. Antioxidants helps to neutralize the oxygen-based free radicals that are present in the body. Cacao is abundant in phenolic phytochemicals and possesses a high amount of flavonoids as well.

Of course, everything in moderation!

 

 

Jodi’s Sweet Potato Brownies
Grain Free, Paleo, GF, Dairy free
Happily serves 12

ALL ORGANIC INGREDIENTS

2 medium Sweet Potatoes
14 Medjool Dates
1 1/2 Cups Quinoa or Almond Flour
4 TBSP Raw CACAO Powder
3 TBSP maple Syrup (Grade B) or Coconut netar
Pinch of sea salt

Peel Sweet Potatoes. Slice/cut and steam for about 20 mins until soft.
The smaller the pieces, the faster it will cook.

Add Sweet Potatoes and Dates to food processor, blend until a creamy smooth texture.
Mix all other ingredients in a bowl, then add cream mixture. Stir well.
Place on Parchment paper lined baking dish and bake for 20-30 mins on 350 until the toothpick comes out dry.
Allow to cool 10 mins for the brownies to gel together, very important step!!

Tip: If you don’t use raw cacao powder, you cause conventional cocoa powder but you will need to double the quantity.

 

 

Chocolate Nut Butter Cookies
GF, Refined Sugar Free
Happily serves 12

ALL ORGANIC INGREDIENTS

1 Cup Chocolate Peanut or Sunflower butter
3/4 Cup Coconut sugar
1 egg

Combine all ingredients. Bake on 350 for 7-8 mins.
If you are not using an already flavored nut butter, you can use a regular nut butter and ad 1/4 cup raw cacao
Chocolate Iced Coffee Protein Shake
Dairy Free, Vegan, Refined Sugar Free
Happily serves 1

ALL ORGANIC INGREDIENTS

2 TBSP Raw Cacao powder
2 TBSP Collagen Powder
2 oz Coconut milk
2 oz Cold brew (optional)
4-6 oz Chai Tea or water
Dash of cinnamon
Stevia Powder if desired sweeter
Ice

Blend all ingredients in bullet/blender, transfer to shaker bottle.

Candida Control

Candida Control
Enzyme Science
$34.50

Candida Control™ includes two enzymes for maintaining normal yeast production.* The enzyme cellulase breaks down the cell wall of candida, while protease removes the toxins expelled during cell death.* This combination may ease discomforts common to cleansing (die-off).* Broccoli Seed extract, as well as beneficial microflora (probiotics), work together to support healthy detoxification.* Enzyme Sciences exclusive Thera-blend™ enzymes are effective throughout the entire digestive system, thereby ensuring complete digestion.* When formulated for therapeutic purposes, Thera-blend enzymes are customized for optimal performance throughout the entire body.
Servings Per Container: 42
Take 2 capsules three times per day on an empty stomach (1/2 hour before or 2 hours after a meal). More may be taken as directed by your healthcare practitioner.*

Serving Size: 2 capsules
Amount Per Serving
Cellulase Thera-blend™ … 70, 000CU
Protease Thera-Blend™ … 230, 000HUT
Broccoli Seed Extract … 40mg
Probiotic Blend … 1 Billion CFU
Bacillus subtilis, l.rhamnosus, l.casei, L.acidophilus, L.plantarum, L.bulgaricus, L.salivarius, L.paracasei
Other Ingredients: 100% vegetarian capsule (cellulose, water)
Contains NO: Dairy, egg, preservatives, salt, sucrose, soy, wheat, yeast, nuts, corn, gluten, casein, potato, rice, artificial colors or flavors
Contraindications: Candida Control should not be taken with any timed released medications that use cellulose as its time-release mechanism. Keep closed in dry place; avoid excessive heat.

Garlic Shrimp Salad

Garlic Shrimp Salad

Gluten Free, Dairy Free
Happily serves 4

ALL ORGANIC INGREDIENTS

SALAD- greens and sprouts

3 Garlic Cloves
1 lb Wild caught Shrimp
1 Cup Asparagus
1 Cup Artichoke
3 TBSP Bone broth
1 Red bell pepper
3 TBSP Fresh Parsley

DRESSING

3 TBSP  Fresh lemon juice
3 TBSP Hemp Seed Oil
1-2 TBSP Dijon Mustard
1 tsp Raw Honey (can sub Stevia or Monk Fruit)
Himalayan Sea Salt
Cracked black pepper to taste

Press Garlic, Let sit 5-10 mins.

Chop bell pepper and asparagus. Cut Artichoke.

Rinse and drain Shrimp, pat shrimp dry
Add bone broth to cast iron skillet, sauté asparagus, artichokes, and bell peppers.
Whisk it together lemon juice, hemp seed oil, mustard, honey and garlic.
Toss shrimp with veggies,  dressing and herbs, lay on a bed of MicroGreens.
Best if you let the shrimp marinade at least 15 minutes.

Use the Code JLDFIT for 25% off your first month’s membership on BamBoxProduce

Pumpkin Cornbread

pumpkin cornbread

PUMPKIN CORNBREAD

Vegan, GF, Dairy Free

Happily Serves 8

ALL ORGANIC INGREDIENTS

¾ cup almond or coconut milk, room temperature

¼ cup Coconut vinegar

1 cup cornmeal

1 cup GF All purpose flour (can sub quinoa flour)

½ teaspoon Himalayan Sea salt

½ teaspoon cinnamon

½ teaspoon baking soda

½ cup softened coconut oil

cup brown sugar, packed (can sub coconut sugar)

1 can pumpkin puree or 2 cups fresh pumpkin

Preheat oven to 375 degrees F and prepare a 9 in cast iron skillet (or square pan) with cooking spray.

Stir together nut milk and vinegar. Let sit for 10 minutes while you prep the rest of the ingredients.

Whisk together your dry ingredients: cornmeal, whole wheat pastry flour, salt, cinnamon, and baking soda and set aside.

Whisk together coconut oil and granulated sugar until well combined.

Whisk in pumpkin puree.

Stir in almond milk/vinegar mixture.

Now stir in your dry ingredients.

Mix until just combined.

Don’t over mix, or you’ll end up with tough bread!

Bake for about 25-35 minutes, or until an inserted toothpick comes out clean.

Remove from the oven, let cool slightly and then serve immediately 

More Cornbread Recipes

Quinoa Brittle

Quinoa Brittle

Vegan, Gluten free, Refined Sugar Free
Happily Serves 10

ALL ORGANIC INGREDIENTS 

3/4 Cup Tricolor uncooked quinoa

3/4 cup Pecans

2 TBSP Coconut sugar

1/2 tsp Pumpkin pie or allspice

2 TBSP Coconut oil

1/4 cup Blackstrap Molasses

1/4 cinnamon

Pinch of Himalayan sea salt

Stevia, if you desire it sweeter

Preheat oven to 325.

Line a baking sheet with parchment paper. (Cover all edges)

Combine quinoa, pecans, coconut sugar, salt, and cinnamon/spices in a bowl and set aside.

Over low to medium heat, add the coconut oil and black strap molasses (and optional Stevia). Stir until there is no visible separation.  Pour over the dry ingredients, combine and coat evenly,  spread on a parchment lined baking sheet with a metal spoon.

Try to get it as even as possible or the edges will burn in the center won’t crisp up.

Bake for 15 minutes and turn the pan around to ensure even baking and Browning. Back 5 to 10 minutes more and watch carefully so it does not burn. The edges will get crisp and caramelized, and the color will be uniformly deep golden brown in color.

Let it cool completely before breaking it into serving pieces.   You can store leftovers in a sealed container at room temperature for a week, or in the freezer for up to one month.

Asian Chick Pea Kale Salad Recipe

asian salad

Asian Chick Pea Kale Salad

Vegan, Gluten Free

Happily Serves 4

VEGETABLES

1 large bundle finely chopped kale  (steamed and drained)

1 cup finely grated carrots (steamed)

2 cups finely shredded red cabbage (Steamed)

DRESSING

1/4 cup cashew butter (or sub sunflower butter)

1/4 cup + 1 Tbsp Korean BBQ sauce (Skyvalley brand)

1/4 cup sesame oil

3 Tbsp maple syrup

Sea salt or 1 Tbsp tamari or coco amigos

CHICKPEAS

1 Cup soaked and dried chickpeas (or sub Mung beans)

2 Tbsp sesame oil or avocado oil

2 tsp maple syrup

1 garlic clove

optional: red pepper flakes or chili powder

Preheat oven to 425

When preparing chickpeas, make sure they are dry – this will help them crisp up.

In a medium mixing bowl add sesame oil, maple syrup and Korean BBQ sauce and whisk.  Add chickpeas and toss to coat. Arrange on a baking stone/sheet and bake for 20-25 minutes, tossing halfway to ensure even baking. They’re done when crisp and deep golden brown.

To prepare dressing, add all ingredients and whisk to combine. Taste and adjust flavors as needed, adding more maple syrup for sweetness, Korean BBQ sauce for heat, cashew butter for creaminess, or salt or tamari for saltiness.

Add kale (steamed), carrots and cabbage to a large mixing/serving bowl and toss to combine. Then add dressing, toss to coat.

To serve, divide salad between serving plates and top with crunchy chickpeas.  Keep leftover chickpeas separate from salad in a well-sealed container at room temperature for 2 days

Hot mess: The grossest health concerns of summer

 

(CNN)You are not the only one who thrives in the summer and loves its warm, long days. Bacteria and other microbes that cause food poisoning, diarrhea and just general grossness also flourish, threatening to make it a season to be sick.

“Foodborne pathogens follow an annual cycle, and we tend to see peaks of them, especially bacteria, in the summer, at picnics, potlucks and all the outdoor events,” said Melinda Wilkins, director of the online science master’s program in food safety at Michigan State University.
Your gut is not the only part of your body at risk of assault by bacteria such as E. coli in summer months. Bugs lurk in air conditioning filters, especially when it is hot and humid, ready to cause trouble for those with breathing problems. And the skin that protects you from infections can become a portal for them after a bad, blistering sunburn.
Of course, even if some dangers await you at the picnic, pool or beach, it is worth it to get out and enjoy yourself. You can most likely handle what comes your way.

Don’t pee (or poop) in the pool

The burn you feel in your eyes after a dip in the swimming pool is not because of chlorine. It is because pee, poop and sweat from fellow swimmers (and maybe you) react with chlorine and form chloramine compounds,and this combination is what really stings your peepers. Aside from the gross factor, the formation of these compounds means there is less chlorine left in the water to kill bacteria, such as E. coli. Chloramines can also irritate the airways, and when they build up in the air, such as at indoor pools, they can trigger asthma attacks.
“We recommend that you not pee or poop in the water, and shower before you go in,” said Michele Hlavsa, chief of the Health Swimming Program at the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. A 2010 CDC report found that one out of 10 public pools don’t have proper chlorine levels. To make sure you’re not about to take a dip in a bacteria-laden pool, “you can use pool test strips at a pool supply or big box store” to check the chlorine level, Hlavsa said. (The CDC recommends chlorine levels in pools between 1 and 3 parts per million and pH of 7.2 to 7.8.)
Even at the right levels, chlorine does not wipe out everything. A new CDC report found that a parasite called cryptosporidium, which can cause diarrhea and lives up to 10 days in a chlorinated pool, was associated with 37 (54%) of the 69 outbreaks of illness at pools and water parks. “To protect yourself, it’s about not swallowing the water you swim in, and to protect others don’t swim if you have diarrhea,” Hlavsa said.

Lurking in seawater

A day at the beach may leave you with more memories than you imagined if you go home with vibriosis. The infection is caused by vibrio bacteria, which live in some coastal waters and flourish in the warm months between May and October, when the majority of cases occur.
According to the CDC, there are about 80,000 cases each year, and about 100 of them are fatal.
An estimated 52,000 of those cases result from eating contaminated food, such as raw oysters, that have been infected in the water they once lived in. Symptoms usually begin within 24 hours of consumption. They include abdominal pain, diarrhea, nausea, vomiting, fever and chills. The illness lasts about three days.
The bacteria can also cause skin rashes that lead to infection when contaminated water gets into an open wound or even a scratch.
The best way to prevent this infection is to thoroughly cook shellfish and clean hands well after touching raw or undercooked shellfish. Cuts or scrapes should be cleaned well with soap after contact with infected water. When possible, cover the wound with a waterproof bandage before getting it wet.

Beware the picnic burgers

The thought of potato salad sweltering in the heat at the summer picnic may make the burgers on the grill sound pretty appetizing, but think again. “Actually, potato salad has kind of a bad rap, but it is not really a particularly high-risk food,” said Wilkins, of Michigan State University. “But people tend to bring frozen (burger) patties and throw them on the grill before they are fully thawed, (and) ground meat that is not thoroughly cooked is one of the riskiest items” because it can have E. coli, she said.
Ground beef and pork should be cooked to 160 degrees Fahrenheit, ground chicken and turkey to 165 degrees. And yes, that means using a meat thermometer to test the temperature in the middle of the burger, Wilkins said.
Of course, bacteria can still lurk in a big bowl of gooey potato or pasta salad, but not for the reasons you may think. Ingredients such as potatoes, pasta and eggs, not the mayonnaise, are prone to contamination. To play it safe, keep containers of anything you’re supposed to eat cold, such as potato salad, in big bowls or coolers full of ice, Wilkins said.

Bacteria scream for ice cream (machines)

An issue that can plague many an inadequately cleaned soft-serve ice cream dispenser is bacteria. “Listeria (bacteria) is a really sneaky pathogen in that it likes to live in cooler temperatures and populate machinery,” Wilkins said. Listeria infections can cause fever and muscle aches, and they are especially dangerous for pregnant women, who may miscarry as a result.
On the bright side, the Blue Bell ice cream scare has made people more aware of listeria’s potential to lurk in frozen desserts, Wilkins said. It is a good idea to ask the person working at the yogurt shop or ice cream truck when the machines were last cleaned. “It brings the issue to the awareness of the workers and management to double check their procedures,” Wilkins said.

Burn, baby, burn

Sunburns may seem like a sweet souvenir from a day at the beach, but they should really be thought of as potentially harmful wounds. In the most severe cases, people can develop blisters and need to be treated like burn victims, said Dr. Cameron K. Rokhsar, assistant clinical professor of dermatology at the Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai. “The skin sloughs off, (and) if there’s any kind of raw wound, it can predispose you to an infection” and should be treated with a prescription antibiotic ointment, he said.
Worse yet, even just a few serious sunburns may greatly increase your risk of developing skin cancer. A 2014 study found that white women who had five or more blistering sunburns when they were teens were 68% more likely to develop melanoma, the deadliest form of skin cancer.

Brush with jellyfish

Despite that old episode of “Friends” where Joey peed on Monica’s jellyfish sting, urine is not the antidote to the venom of this goopy animal, which is common off beaches across the United States and thrives in warm water. Rinsing the wound with saltwater is one of the most recommended ways to relieve the stinging, redness and swelling that follow a brush with a jellyfish tentacle.
A more surprising but also effective treatment is vinegar, said Rokhsar, who knows firsthand that it can make the pain go away almost instantaneously. “It happened to me. It hurts a lot, and I actually went to the lifeguard station, and they had vinegar spray,” he said.
Also beware of the not-so-cute baby jellyfish called sea lice. Unlike the adults’ sting, theirs doesn’t hurt, so you don’t have to worry about rinsing the wound with saltwater or vinegar. Save the vinegar for rinsing your swimsuit before you wash it. Some believe the larvae can become trapped in the fabric.
You will usually experience an itchy, red rash and small blisters within 24 hours. The rash is sometimes accompanied with fever, chills, headaches and nausea. The symptoms can last as long as two weeks and are not contagious.
The sea lice, which are actually microscopic larvae of marine life such as jellyfish or sea anemones, are most often found in summer waters in Florida and the Caribbean.

Grossness flourishes in air conditioning filters

When air conditioners are working around the clock in hot summer months, dust, mold and pollution from outdoor air (in the case of central AC) or indoor air (in the case of a window unit) tend to build up on the filter of AC units. Not only does this slash the air conditioner’s efficiency, it can also carry health risks, said Abby Brokaw, director of the American Lung Association of the Upper Midwest Health House program.
“People who are already having problems with breathing or lung health — so people with allergies or respiratory disease — are going to be affected” if the filter is not properly cleaned, removing dust, mold, dander and other detritus, Brokaw said.
To keep your filter in tiptop shape, clean or replace it every three months, Brokaw advised. But take precaution when you do. Mold and bacteria love to grow on filters, especially in the summer humidity.
“You don’t want to breathe in mold spores and bacteria. We would recommend that you wear gloves and a mask,” Brokaw said, referring to surgical masks sold in drugstores.

Read more: http://www.cnn.com/2015/06/26/health/gross-summer-health/index.html