Jodi’s Fudgy Brownies

Jodi’s Fudgy brownies

Grain free, Refined sugar free, Dairy free, Gluten Free,

Happily Serves 12

ALL ORGANIC INGREDIENTS 

1 Egg

2 Cups Black beans rinsed, drained & cooked

One avocado

1 TBSP vanilla extract

1/2 Cup Coconut Brown sugar

2/3 Cup Carob

1-2 tsp Coconut oil

1/4 tsp baking soda

1/4 tsp baking powder

1/2 tsp Himalayan Sea Salt

1/2 cup dairy free chocolate chips

Preheat oven to 350°. Grease an 8 x 8″ baking stone.

Mix egg, black beans, avocado, vanilla and sugar in the food processor until smooth.

Add the Carob,  coconut oil, baking soda, baking powder and mix again until smooth.

Batter needs to be sticky to be fudgy.

If you want it thinner add a tablespoon or so of coconut milk.

Fold in the chocolate chips spread in the pan and bake for about 25 minutes or until toothpick comes out clean. Cool completely.

Tips:  The food processor is best.  It  blends and hides the consistency of the beans.

Jodi’s Chocolate Zucchini Oatmeal Chocolate Chip Cookies

Healthy Chocolate Chip Cookies

Healthy Cookies???

Everyone loves cookies, so why not make them with organic ingredients.  If they are healthy and tasty, that is the best of both worlds.  THESE ARE SUPER TASTY.

Here is the recipe

Jodi’s Chocolate zucchini oatmeal chocolate chip cookies

1 1/2 cups all-purpose flour (I used 1/2 c quinoa flour and 1 cup all purpose gluten free flour)
1 teaspoon ground cinnamon
1/2 teaspoon baking soda
1/4 teaspoon salt
1/2 butter  (I used coconut oil)
1/2 Cup organic sugar (I used organic turbinado raw cane sugar)
1/3 cup brown sugar (I used organic coconut sugar)
1 organic egg (I used Chia seed substitute)
(Sub: 1 tablespoon ground Chia seed to 3 tablespoons water)
1 1/2 teaspoon organic vanilla
1 1/2 cups shredded zucchini
1 cup steel cut oats (I used buckwheat)
1 cup dairy free chocolate chips
1/3 cup cacao nibs
3 tbsp raw cacao powder
2 tsp stevia

Preheat oven to 350°. In a mixing bowl, whisk flour, cinnamon, baking soda, salt, and raw cocoa, set aside.
In the mixing bowl whip butter or coconut oil, sugar and brown sugar until creamy. Mix in the egg and vanilla. Add zucchini to the mixture on low speed, slowly adding the flour mixture. Stir in cooked oats and chocolate chips.
Spoon into balls, and bake 8 to 10 minutes depending on your oven.chocolate zucchini cookies

5 Things You Didn’t Know About Eggs – Eggciting Egg Ideas

“Egg”citing Egg Ideas

Eggs are so good for you.  They are a cheap source of protein for your body and wallet!  Egg whites contain adequate amounts of all essential amino acids.  Eggs are a good source of iodine, important for healthy thyroid function.  Egg yokes contain Lutein, which is an important phytonutrient for eye health.  Eggs are also an excellent source of B Vitamin Choline, which is an important nutrient for brain function.   Eggs have omega 3’s and are a very good source of selenium. Without enough iodine the body cannot synthesize thyroid hormones (T3 & T4).  And without selenium the body cannot have healthy thyroid metabolism function.  
 
1 egg:egg
70 calories
5.5grams Protein
4.5g Fat
55g potassium
186g Cholesterol
0 Fiber
1g Carb
Always Always please choose organic, free range eggs
 

Deviled Eggs
deviled egg

 

 

 

 
 
6 Organic Free Range eggs
1/4 cup Coconut yogurt
1-2 TBSP olive or avocado oil
1 tsp coconut vinegar
1 tsp Organic yellow mustard
1/8 teaspoon salt
 Paprika, for garnish
pepper (optional)
 
Boil eggs. Crack and peel shells.  Remove yokes. Mix with the rest of the ingredients, smashing with a fork. Return mixture to eggs and garnish with Paprika

Egg White Breakfast Pizza

 Break 3-4 Egg whites in a hot pan coated with coconut Oil.  Fry until a round.  Remove from heat.  Add Salsa, or Pizza Sauce and Breakfast sausage or Meat and top with Cheese.  Add Salt and Pepper
 

Egg in an Avocado

Preheat oven to 425 degrees
 
Cut Avocado in Half, Remove pit.  Scoop out extra if the hole is small.  Use the left over yoke from breakfast pizza and put in the middle of the avocado. Season each filled avocado with chives, parsley, sea salt, and pepper.
Bake about 15 mins
 

How to Make a Hard Boiled Egg

 

How to Reduce Anxiety – Herbs for Anxiety Reduction – Reduce Anxiety with Herbs

Herbs for Anxiety

Not looking to use Conventional Drugs to help ease Anxiety?  Try some of these herbs.

Licorice Root contains a natural hormone alternative to cortisone, which can help the body handle stressful situations, and can help to normalize blood sugar levels as well as your adrenal glands, providing you with the energy necessary to deal with the stressful situation at hand. Some claim licorice stimulates cranial and cerebrospinal fluid, thereby calming the mind.As a soothing tonic, drink it warm as in a tea.

Kava Kava, an herb from the South Pacific, is a powerful muscle relaxer and analgesic. Kava Kava is also effective at treating depression and anxiety associated with menopause. http://www.care2.com/greenliving/5-herbs-that-reduce-stress-and-anxiety.html#ixzz3zjWfhIxL

Valerian

Some herbal supplements reduce anxiety without making you sleepy (such as L-theanine), while others are sedatives. Valerian (Valeriana officinalis) is squarely in the second category. It is a sleep aid, for insomnia. It contains sedative compounds; the German government has approved it as a treatment for sleep problems.

Valerian smells kind of nasty, so most people take it as a capsule or tincture, rather than a tea. If you want to try it, take it in the evening—not before you go to work! Valerian is often combined with other sedative herbs such as hops, chamomile, and lemon balm.

Hops

Yes, it’s in beer, but you won’t get the tranquilizing benefits of the bitter herb hops (Humulus lupulus)from a brew. The sedative compound in hops is a volatile oil, so you get it in extracts and tinctures—and as aromatherapy in hops pillows.

“It’s very bitter, so you don’t see it in tea much, unless combined with chamomile or mint,” says Blumenthal. Hops is often used as a sedative, to promote sleep, often with another herb, valerian. Note: Don’t take sedative herbs if you are taking a prescription tranquilizer or sedative, and let your doctor know any supplements you are taking.

Chamomile

If you have a jittery moment, a cuppa chamomile tea might help calm you down. Some compounds in chamomile (Matricaria recutita) bind to the same brain receptors as drugs like Valium.

You can also take it as a supplement, typically standardized to contain 1.2% apigenin (an active ingredient), along with dried chamomile flowers. In one study at the University of Pennsylvania Medical Center, in Philadelphia, patients with generalized anxiety disorder (GAD) who took chamomile supplements for eight weeks had a significant decrease in anxiety symptoms compared to patients taking placebo.

Passion Flower

The University of Maryland Medical Center states that passionflower has shown in a few studies to work as well as some of the benzodiazepine medications that are usually prescribed for treating anxiety.

A four-week double-blind study, for example, compared passionflower with oxazepam. Results showed oxazepam worked more quickly, but by the end of the study period, both treatments were shown to be equally effective. Bonus—side effects like daytime drowsiness were fewer with passionflower.

A second study also showed that passionflower helped ease symptoms like anxiety, irritability, agitation, and depression in participants going through withdrawal from an opiate drug addiction.

Dosage: Try one cup of passionflower tea three times daily, 45 drops of liquid extract daily, or about 90 mg/day.

Lavendar

A 2010 multi-center, a double-blind randomized study of lavender oil compared to anti-anxiety medication lorazepam found that both were effective against generalized and persistent anxiety. Bonus — lavender had no sedative side effects.

“Since lavender oil showed no sedative effects,” researchers stated, it could be an effective and “well-tolerated alternative to benzodiazepines” to treat generalized anxiety. An earlier 2000 study found similar results.

Dosage: Try about 80 mg/day of the supplement, or use the oil as an aromatherapy solution.

Lemon Balm

Though usually found in combination with other herbs, lemon balm also has anti-anxiety powers on its own.

Research published in 2004, for instance, gave participants a single dose of lemon balm extract (300 mg or 600 mg) or a placebo, then measured their mood after one hour. The higher dose resulted in reduced stress and improved calmness and alertness. Even the lower dose helped participants do math problems more quickly.

Dosage: Use in aromatherapy, try 300-500 mg of dried lemon balm three times daily, 60 drops daily, or 1/4 to 1 teaspoon of dried lemon balm herb in hot water for a tea four times daily.

Ashwagandha

A 2012 double-blind, placebo-controlled study gave participants either placebo or a capsule containing 300 mg of high-concentration full-spectrum ashwagandha extract, twice a day. The study lasted for 60 days. Those taking the ashwagandha showed significant improvements. Even the levels of the stress hormone cortisol were substantially reduced in those taking the extract. And there were no serious side effects.

In an earlier 2000 study, ashwagandha had anxiety-relieving effects similar to those of lorazepam.

Dosage: Typical dosage is 300 mg standardized to at least one to five percent withanolides, once or twice a day.

L-Theanine

This one isn’t really a herb — it’s a water-soluble amino acid,  but it’s gotten such good research behind it, we had to include it here. It’s found mainly in green tea and black tea and is also available as a supplement.

Studies have found that it acts directly on the brain, helping to reduce stress and anxiety—without causing drowsiness.

Research from 2008, for example, found that those participants taking 50 mg of L-theanine a day had a greater increase in alpha (relaxed brain waves) activity than those who took a placebo.

An earlier 1998 study found that 200 mg a day leads to increased alpha brain waves and a relaxed, yet alert, a state of mind.

A later 2011 study found that it was also associated with reduced anxiety, and was well tolerated and safe for participants.

Dosage: A typical cup of black tea contains only about 25 mg of l-theanine and green tea only about 8 mg. While a cup of tea may be calming, if you want more potent effects, try a supplement, about 200 mg a day.