Ideas for Alternative Protein Sources

Alternative Protein Sources

Antioxidant Rich foods: EAT FROM THE RAINBOW!
RED: Lycopene
YELLOW/ORANGE: Beta Carotene & Beta Crytoxanthin
BLUE/PURPLE: Anthocyanins
GREEN: Chlorophyll

GREEN FOOD BASICS:
Green foods have a high content of chlorophyll due to porphyrin rings.
* Chlorophyll and heme units of red blood cells are virtually identical except the center molecule
* Chlorophyll-magnesium
* Heme-Iron
* Heme units are the building blocks for red blood cells
* Therefore, all green foods help the body to create new blood.

How can I combat muscle fatigue?
More GREEN foods create energy in the body! How do plants grow?
They need sun, water, rest, minerals and vitamins, and time.

Spirulina
Can help increase endurance and stamina
Rich source of carotenoids and other valuable phyco-chemicals
May reduce cravings and appetite
Can help promote healthy cholesterol levels and cardiovascular function
Spirulina has been widely regarded as nature`s most complete nutrient source. Organic Spirulina is a rich, whole-food source of vegetarian protein, chlorophyll, essential amino acids, antioxidants, and vitamins. It contains an abundant amount of phycocyanin, a unique, blue-green pigment that may support healthy immune function.

Chlorella
Rich In Chlorophyll
Chlorella contains up to 7% natural chlorophyll, the highest percentage of any known plant on earth. Plant chlorophyll is one of nature’s most powerful cleansing agents.
Rich In Protein
Chlorella contains about 60% protein that is high quality and easy to assimilate, as compared to rice, about 7% protein.
Protein is essential to support the body’s tissues, metabolism and to build the immune system.
Rich In Nucleic Acids
Chlorella is ultra-rich in nucleic acids, key RNA and DNA factors that help protect every cell and raise energy levels.
Rich In Chlorella Growth Factor (CGF)
This famous key factor can help speed your body’s rejuvenation and restoration naturally.
Rich in Vitamins, Minerals, Enzymes, Antioxidants
Chlorella is packed full of naturally occurring nutrients, including the powerful antioxidant, lipoic acid. It is an excellent source of iron and vitamin B12, often deficient in older people. Chlorella has more B12 than liver!

*How can I combat muscle fatigue?
More GREEN foods create energy in the body! How do plants grow?
They need sun, water, rest, minerals and vitamins, and time.
IRON:
There are two types of iron —
Heme: found in animal foods
Non-heme: Comes from plants.
Heme iron (the kind from animals) is better absorbed than non-heme iron.
Darker meat is better, more oxygen to the muscles leave the brown color, not fat content. Usually leg/rump cuts are best.

Getting enough iron?
Use Cast iron cookware…Easy!
Good sources of iron are:
Legumes: lentils, soybeans, tofu, tempeh, lima beans
Grains: quinoa, black/brown rice, oatmeal
Nuts and seeds: pumpkin, squash, pine, pistacio, sunflower, cashews, unhulled sesame
Vegetables: swiss chard, collard greens, basil, broccoli, romaine lettuce, green beans
blackstrap molasses, prune juice, cacao, chocolate, cinnamon, turmeric

B12 Sources: Most fish, calf’s liver, eggs
B6 Sources: Spinach and kale (don’t eat raw), bell peppers, garlic, broccoli, collard greens, Brussel sprouts, crimini musahrooms, celery
ORAC= Oxygen Radical Absorbance Capacity
Www.superfoodly.com

ReCap: Cutting Board Education Night

If you missed the Local education night here is a few things we discussed:

Muscle building with Plant Protein
*How do you support a body on a plant based diet without eating meat?

Earth is the ultimate prism. Every green plant captures a different wavelength of light and energy from the sun. A collection of juices from sea plants, field grasses and garden vegetables will alkalize your body, build up your blood, and cleanse your cells.

What is a Carbohydrate? Fruit, vegetable, starch, grain, pasta
What is a Protein? Animal meat, dairy
What is a Fat? Nut, seed or oil

How Much do we need daily? Age/Gender/Health History
Carbs: Weight loss must be under 50g a day, aim for no more than 30g of carbs at a meal and 8g of sugars within those carbs. Think higher fiber foods.
Protein: 1g per 1kg body weight (think about half your body weight)
Fat: 25-30% daily calories can come from the pure sources of healthy fats.

***Ratios are different for everyone and Should be evaluated by a Certified Health Professional or Holistic Professional based on your health history.***

What are Amino Acids? What do they do?
Assists with the stabilization or recovery of muscle strength, endurance, and volume
Helps keep body tissues firm
Helps minimize body fat
May support a weight loss regimen
Aid in normalizing protein synthesis

If the essential amino acids are not present in the daily diet the body will break down existing proteins in order to supply the body with the missing amino acids.

Essential Amino Acids:
Cannot be produced in our body and thus must be consumed in our diets. The essential amino acids humans cannot synthesize are:
Phenylalanine, valine, threonine, tryptophan, methionine, leucine, isoleucine, lysine, and histidine. (Arginine is mostly required in young children and not as important as adults)

Non-Essential Amino Acids: These can be synthesized by the body.
Proteins drive ALL functions of the various organs of the human body.
Alanine (from pyruvic acid)
Arginine (from glutamic acid)
Asparagine (from aspartic acid)
Aspartic Acid (from oxaloacetic acid)
Cysteine
Glutamic Acid (from oxoglutaric acid)
Glutamine (from glutamic acid)
Glycine (from serine and threonine)
Proline (from glutamic acid)
Serine (from glucose)
Tyrosine (from phenylalanine)

If you fail to obtain even just one out of the essential amino acids, your body’s proteins so not complete and the body is forced to steal from bones and elsewhere to create metabolic processes in your body. Also, unlike fats and carbohydrates, your body does not store excess supplies of amino acids for later use – you need a regular supply of them everyday.

Foods with amino acids include animal and vegetable sources. Most of the animal sources such as meat, eggs and milk are considered to be “complete protein sources” meaning that these contain all the essential amino acids that your body needs.
Vegetables are also good amino acid food sources but most of them do not usually contain all essential aminos.

Amino Acid Deficiency and Supplementation
Many people who are sick, fatigued, or trying weight loss programs, vegetarians or Vegans consume insufficient amounts of protein. Thus, supplementation of amino acids has been increasingly necessary. B6 and B12 are the most common of deficiencies when not consuming animal protein.

Non Meat Forms of Amino Acids: Think SEA LIFE!
*How can I combat muscle fatigue or just plain being tired all the time?
More GREEN foods create energy in the body! How do plants grow? They need sun, water, rest, minerals and vitamins, and time.

Antioxidant Rich foods: EAT FROM THE RAINBOW!
RED: Lycopene
YELLOW/ORANGE: Beta Carotene & Beta Crytoxanthin
BLUE/PURPLE: Anthocyanins
GREEN: Chlorophyll

GREEN FOOD BASICS:
*Green foods have a high content of chlorophyll due to porphyrin rings.
* Chlorophyll and heme units of red blood cells are virtually identical except the center molecule
* Chlorophyll-magnesium
* Heme-Iron
* Heme units are the building blocks for red blood cells
* Therefore, all green foods help the body to create new blood.

*How do we use food as medicine so we can fuel the body, heal and repair?
Basic Weight management Strategies and Lifestyle Strategies
1-Adequate ATP
2-Nutrient Density-Organic Foods. **A MUST!!!**
3-Balance-60-80% Alkalizing (pH Balance)
4-Moderation-Limited Refined Sugar
5-Calorie Control=Calorie Restriction
6-Variety= Seasonal Eating VS Emotional Eating
Refer to www.healthywithjodi.com for my Sweet 16 Eating Healthy Guidelines and how to achieve balance.

Definitions and menu DeCoding:
Vegan: A strict vegetarian who consumes no products from an animal, such as meat eggs or dairy products or stains from using animal products such as the leather.
Vegetarian: does not eat or believe in eating meat, fish, Fowl or any food drive from animals such as eggs or cheese. Uses fruits, vegetables, and grains for food sources.
Paleo: consume vegetables, fruits, nuts, lean meats, no grains, no processed foods.
Pescatarians: do not eat any land animals or birds such as beef pork chicken or turkey. Will eat fish and other seafood such as shrimp and clams. They do eat fruits, vegetables, beans, greens and nuts.
Lacto vegetarian: includes vegetables and dairy products such as milk, cheese, yogurt, butter, ghee, cream, Keefer but excludes eggs.

Food Catagories: Do you now what you are eating and how to combine them? (Just a few listed below)

Whole Grain, Gluten
Tamari, Coconut Aminos, Soy Sauce
Flax Seed, Chia Seed, hemp hearts, Tahini
Hummus, lentils, Tofu, beans
Nut Meat, Nut Milk, Quinoa
Micro greens, Sprouts

Spices: parts of the plant other than the leafy bit such as the root, stem, Bulb, bark or seeds ex: cinnamon, cloves, ginger and pepper.
Herbs: come from the leafy and green part of the plant. Ex: Basil, oregano, rosemary, Parsley, mint.
Spices and herbs add MAJOR nutrients to your meals, you can achieve therapeutic ranges when you use ORGANIC spices/herbs daily. Www.superfoodly.com

*What do I pair together to equal complete protein meal?
A nut or seed plus a legume equals a complete Protein.

BASIC PROTEIN NUTRITION INFO:**Even though you are worried about getting enough protein, you need to watch the Carbohydrate content of your meal. **
1/2 cup beans: average 7g protein Black, 7g protein garbanzo (20g carbs) 120 cal
1 small sweet potato: Not a nightshade 2g protein (22g carbs) 95 cal
1/2 cup yam: 2g protein (22g carb) ROOT Vegetable 95 cal
1/2 cup lentils (Legumes): average 9g protein (20g carb) 7g fiber
1/4cup Quinoa equals a cup cooked: 6g protein (29g carbs) 160 cal.
HAS ALL 9 ESSENTIAL AA
1 TBSP or 1/8cup nuts: walnuts: 2g protein (1g carb) 90cal
1 TBSP seeds: flax seeds: 3g protein (7g carb) 60 cal
1/2 cup brown rice: 5g protein (23g carbs) 150 cal
1/2 cup Black Rice: 10 LESS carbs than brown rice
4oz Tofu: 9g protein (3g carbs) 90cal
1/2 cup Soy beans: 14g (9g carbs) 150 cal
1 cup Avocado: balanced Meal!!! 3g protein (11g carbs) 7g fiber 22g fat 250 cal

Winter Squash Pancakes

Winter Squash Pancakes

Vegan, GF, Refined Sugar free
Happily serves 4

ALL ORGANIC INGREDIENTS
PANCAKES
1 cup Cooked and smashed winter squash
1/3 cup cashew cream or vegan cream cheese
2 large eggs (or flax egg)
1/2 cup coconut yogurt
3/4 teaspoon sea salt
A dash black pepper
1 teaspoon baking powder
1 cup all-purpose GF flour
coconut oil for frying pan

TO FINISH:
Crispy Sage Brown Butter:
2 to 3 tablespoons butter
A pinch or two of salt
A few fresh sage leaves

In a large bowl, whisk squash, yogurt, eggs, cheese, salt, pepper and baking powder until smooth.
Add flour and stir until just combined. Batter will be thick.

Heat skillet medium-low to medium.  Coat the bottom with coconut oil, and spoon in pancake batter,  flatten the pancake slightly.
Cook until golden brown underneath, flip and cook until golden brown.
Lower your heat, if it’s cooking too fast. If you’re worried pancakes have not cooked in the center, you can finish them for 10 minutes in a 250 degrees oven.

To finish, wipe out frying pan and add butter (or you can use coconut oil), a Dash of salt and sage leaves, heating over medium heat. The sage leaves will crisp and the butter will brown in a minute or two so keep a close watch on it. Pour leaves and butter over pancakes

To roast squash: For butternut or kabocha, roast it face-down on an a baking sheet sprinkled with coarse salt at 375 for 40 to 50 minutes, until tender.

Why Should I Eat Organic? Reasons Why You Should Eat Organic…

Importance of Organic Foods

Organic Foods – Nutrient Density

Simply stated, nutrient density means how many nutrients you get from a food, given the number of calories it contains. Nutrient density is a simple way to connect nutrients with calories.

– World’s Healthiest Foods

What’s In Organic Foods?

Higher Nutrient Content

More Vitamins & Minerals per Calorie

More Essential Fatty Acids & Amino Acids per Calorie

More Antioxidants per Calorie

What’s Not in Organic Foods?

*Acetylcholine Esterase Inhibitors

Acetylcholine

Acetylcholine is the body’s most predominant neurotransmitter.

Essential for Memory Recall & Quick Thinking

Nutrient Density: Organic Legumes, Vegetables, Fruits

Acetylcholine Esterase

Acetylcholine Esterase is the enzyme that clears the neurosynaptic junction allowing for the next impulse to come.

This is an especially important cycle for inhaling/exhaling during respiration and the contractions and relaxations of the heart muscle.

◦Thus Pesticides have an adverse effect upon the Lungs & Heart.

List of Banned Chemicals

http://scorecard.goodguide.com/chemical-groups/one-list.tcl?short_list_name=brpest

Consequently, “The nutritive value of crops and their ability to handle pests and diseases is diminished.” The bottom line, Kittredge says, is, “across the board, our foodstuffs are less nutritious than they were. It’s well documented. Between 1940 and 2009, in a basic salad, USDA records show a 55-70 percent decrease in mineral levels.” – Remineralize the Earth

We identified 191 matched pairs with valid comparisons of antioxidant, vitamin and mineral levels. Of these, 119 organic samples within the matched pairs had higher nutrient levels, or 62% of the total matched pairs.

◦State of Science Review: Nutritional Superiority of Organic Foods – Charles Benbrook, Xin Zhao, Jaime Yáñez, Neal Davies and Preston Andrews- www.orgain-center.org 53 pages

Quinoa Brittle

Quinoa Brittle

Vegan, Gluten free, Refined Sugar Free
Happily Serves 10

ALL ORGANIC INGREDIENTS 

3/4 Cup Tricolor uncooked quinoa

3/4 cup Pecans

2 TBSP Coconut sugar

1/2 tsp Pumpkin pie or allspice

2 TBSP Coconut oil

1/4 cup Blackstrap Molasses

1/4 cinnamon

Pinch of Himalayan sea salt

Stevia, if you desire it sweeter

Preheat oven to 325.

Line a baking sheet with parchment paper. (Cover all edges)

Combine quinoa, pecans, coconut sugar, salt, and cinnamon/spices in a bowl and set aside.

Over low to medium heat, add the coconut oil and black strap molasses (and optional Stevia). Stir until there is no visible separation.  Pour over the dry ingredients, combine and coat evenly,  spread on a parchment lined baking sheet with a metal spoon.

Try to get it as even as possible or the edges will burn in the center won’t crisp up.

Bake for 15 minutes and turn the pan around to ensure even baking and Browning. Back 5 to 10 minutes more and watch carefully so it does not burn. The edges will get crisp and caramelized, and the color will be uniformly deep golden brown in color.

Let it cool completely before breaking it into serving pieces.   You can store leftovers in a sealed container at room temperature for a week, or in the freezer for up to one month.

How to Reduce Anxiety – Herbs for Anxiety Reduction – Reduce Anxiety with Herbs

Herbs for Anxiety

Not looking to use Conventional Drugs to help ease Anxiety?  Try some of these herbs.

Licorice Root contains a natural hormone alternative to cortisone, which can help the body handle stressful situations, and can help to normalize blood sugar levels as well as your adrenal glands, providing you with the energy necessary to deal with the stressful situation at hand. Some claim licorice stimulates cranial and cerebrospinal fluid, thereby calming the mind.As a soothing tonic, drink it warm as in a tea.

Kava Kava, an herb from the South Pacific, is a powerful muscle relaxer and analgesic. Kava Kava is also effective at treating depression and anxiety associated with menopause. http://www.care2.com/greenliving/5-herbs-that-reduce-stress-and-anxiety.html#ixzz3zjWfhIxL

Valerian

Some herbal supplements reduce anxiety without making you sleepy (such as L-theanine), while others are sedatives. Valerian (Valeriana officinalis) is squarely in the second category. It is a sleep aid, for insomnia. It contains sedative compounds; the German government has approved it as a treatment for sleep problems.

Valerian smells kind of nasty, so most people take it as a capsule or tincture, rather than a tea. If you want to try it, take it in the evening—not before you go to work! Valerian is often combined with other sedative herbs such as hops, chamomile, and lemon balm.

Hops

Yes, it’s in beer, but you won’t get the tranquilizing benefits of the bitter herb hops (Humulus lupulus)from a brew. The sedative compound in hops is a volatile oil, so you get it in extracts and tinctures—and as aromatherapy in hops pillows.

“It’s very bitter, so you don’t see it in tea much, unless combined with chamomile or mint,” says Blumenthal. Hops is often used as a sedative, to promote sleep, often with another herb, valerian. Note: Don’t take sedative herbs if you are taking a prescription tranquilizer or sedative, and let your doctor know any supplements you are taking.

Chamomile

If you have a jittery moment, a cuppa chamomile tea might help calm you down. Some compounds in chamomile (Matricaria recutita) bind to the same brain receptors as drugs like Valium.

You can also take it as a supplement, typically standardized to contain 1.2% apigenin (an active ingredient), along with dried chamomile flowers. In one study at the University of Pennsylvania Medical Center, in Philadelphia, patients with generalized anxiety disorder (GAD) who took chamomile supplements for eight weeks had a significant decrease in anxiety symptoms compared to patients taking placebo.

Passion Flower

The University of Maryland Medical Center states that passionflower has shown in a few studies to work as well as some of the benzodiazepine medications that are usually prescribed for treating anxiety.

A four-week double-blind study, for example, compared passionflower with oxazepam. Results showed oxazepam worked more quickly, but by the end of the study period, both treatments were shown to be equally effective. Bonus—side effects like daytime drowsiness were fewer with passionflower.

A second study also showed that passionflower helped ease symptoms like anxiety, irritability, agitation, and depression in participants going through withdrawal from an opiate drug addiction.

Dosage: Try one cup of passionflower tea three times daily, 45 drops of liquid extract daily, or about 90 mg/day.

Lavendar

A 2010 multi-center, a double-blind randomized study of lavender oil compared to anti-anxiety medication lorazepam found that both were effective against generalized and persistent anxiety. Bonus — lavender had no sedative side effects.

“Since lavender oil showed no sedative effects,” researchers stated, it could be an effective and “well-tolerated alternative to benzodiazepines” to treat generalized anxiety. An earlier 2000 study found similar results.

Dosage: Try about 80 mg/day of the supplement, or use the oil as an aromatherapy solution.

Lemon Balm

Though usually found in combination with other herbs, lemon balm also has anti-anxiety powers on its own.

Research published in 2004, for instance, gave participants a single dose of lemon balm extract (300 mg or 600 mg) or a placebo, then measured their mood after one hour. The higher dose resulted in reduced stress and improved calmness and alertness. Even the lower dose helped participants do math problems more quickly.

Dosage: Use in aromatherapy, try 300-500 mg of dried lemon balm three times daily, 60 drops daily, or 1/4 to 1 teaspoon of dried lemon balm herb in hot water for a tea four times daily.

Ashwagandha

A 2012 double-blind, placebo-controlled study gave participants either placebo or a capsule containing 300 mg of high-concentration full-spectrum ashwagandha extract, twice a day. The study lasted for 60 days. Those taking the ashwagandha showed significant improvements. Even the levels of the stress hormone cortisol were substantially reduced in those taking the extract. And there were no serious side effects.

In an earlier 2000 study, ashwagandha had anxiety-relieving effects similar to those of lorazepam.

Dosage: Typical dosage is 300 mg standardized to at least one to five percent withanolides, once or twice a day.

L-Theanine

This one isn’t really a herb — it’s a water-soluble amino acid,  but it’s gotten such good research behind it, we had to include it here. It’s found mainly in green tea and black tea and is also available as a supplement.

Studies have found that it acts directly on the brain, helping to reduce stress and anxiety—without causing drowsiness.

Research from 2008, for example, found that those participants taking 50 mg of L-theanine a day had a greater increase in alpha (relaxed brain waves) activity than those who took a placebo.

An earlier 1998 study found that 200 mg a day leads to increased alpha brain waves and a relaxed, yet alert, a state of mind.

A later 2011 study found that it was also associated with reduced anxiety, and was well tolerated and safe for participants.

Dosage: A typical cup of black tea contains only about 25 mg of l-theanine and green tea only about 8 mg. While a cup of tea may be calming, if you want more potent effects, try a supplement, about 200 mg a day.