Gluten-free food labels under new FDA rules

Gluten-free food labels under new FDA rules

* The terms, “gluten free,” “no gluten,” “free of gluten” and “without gluten” can be used on labels of foods that meet the FDA gluten-free standard.
* No universal symbol will appear on packages to indicate that a food meets the FDA gluten-free standard. If a food company wants to indicate that a product meets the standard, it has to use one of the gluten-free terms.
* Certification seals from third parties, for example a seal from the Gluten Free Certification Organization, can continue to be used on labels. The FDA says it does not endorse or recommend any particular certification seal. Any food that uses a third party certification seal must meet the FDA labeling requirements at a minimum. Typically the standards for certification seals are stricter than the FDA requirements.
* The label format is left up to food makers; the FDA does not have a mandated design or any requirements for where the gluten-free label has to be placed.
* Food makers can continue to use the terms, “made with no gluten containing ingredients” and “not made with gluten containing ingredients.” If the terms are used in conjunction with a gluten-free label, the product must meet the FDA standard. If the terms are used without a gluten-free label, the FDA says, “consumers should not assume the food meets all FDA requirements.”
* Food makers can continue to use advisory statements such as, “Made in a factory that also processes wheat products” on a food that also has a gluten-free label. The FDA says it will need to “look at foods on a case by case basis to determine whether a specific advisory statement with a gluten-free claim would be misleading.” Any product with the advisory statement and gluten-free label would have to meet the FDA requirements.
* Naturally gluten-free foods can be labeled gluten free. This is a change from the proposed rules which would have prohibited the gluten-free label on inherently gluten-free foods including gluten-free grains and products like bottled water unless the label also said all foods of the same type were also gluten free. The final rule addresses concerns that some gluten-free grains, legumes and seeds have a high risk of cross-contamination. A gluten-free label on these kinds of products “provide the expectation that any gluten is less than 20 ppm,” the FDA says.
* Gluten-free labeling continues to be voluntary so even products that are gluten free may not be labeled as such. This is likely to come up most often with naturally gluten-free products with a low risk of cross-contamination, fruits and vegetables for example. The lack of a gluten-free label does not mean the food contains gluten.

Amino Acids-Benefits & Facts

Purium Super Amino 23

100% Vegetarian

Vegan Friendly

Superior for Athletes

Super Amino 23 is pre-digested 100% vegetarian and vegan protein that has been featured in the Physician`s Desk Reference* and is comprised of non-soy legumes.

Benefits:
Aids in normalizing protein synthesis
Assists with the stabilization or recovery of muscle strength, endurance, and volume
Helps keep body tissues firm
Helps minimize body fat
May support a weight loss regimen

Interesting Facts:
Super Amino 23 is PREDIGESTED protein and it is 400% to 500% more nutritionally effective than isolates from whey casein and safer than soy. “Pre-digested” means Super Amino 23 does not enter the intestines and is absorbed into the lymph system; thus, Super Amino 23 produces no fecal residue. Because it is pre-digested, it is available to the body within 23 minutes of ingestion.

Super Amino 23 has 99% NNU or Net Nitrogen Utilization, which is why there is no burden on your kidneys or liver like other proteins. This is because the liver and kidneys do not have to clear catabolic waste that comes with the digestion of common dietary protein.

Super Amino 23 has over 30 clinical studies published on its uses and is listed in the Physician`s Desk Reference.

Super Amino 23 is protected by 27 international patents and available in North America. (US Patent no. 5,132,113)
There have been 8 years of field trials on the Super Amino 23
18 years clinical trials: Super Amino 23 was first used for patients with stomach removed because of cancer. Then, elderly patients were given it for nutrition and recovery of lean tissue. Now, the terminally ill are also given Super Amino 23 to improve their quality of life.

Medical doctors use Super Amino 23 to maximize protein utilization and minimize the negative effects of protein diets.
Olympic athletes and fitness buffs around the world use the Super Amino 23.

Super Amino 23 is also used by the Vatican (through its Caritas Foundation) to treat malnutrition & the effects of starvation in developing countries.

Super Amino 23 is an all-natural way to build muscle mass, it also maximizes strength & endurance, minimizes body fat, and reduces recovery time.

The Super Amino 23 formulation can be used for different purposes; as nutrition for people who need more and better protein, as part of a weight control program, for strength building, and as a muscle mass enhancement.

Gluten Free Guide – New Rules under the FDA

Gluten-free food labels under new FDA rules

  • The terms, “gluten free,” “no gluten,” “free of gluten” and “without gluten” can be used on labels of foods that gluten freemeet the FDA gluten-free standard.
  • No universal symbol will appear on packages to indicate that a food meets the FDA gluten-free standard. If a food company wants to indicate that a product meets the standard, it has to use one of the gluten-free terms.
  • Certification seals from third parties, for example a seal from the Gluten Free Certification Organization, can continue to be used on labels. The FDA says it does not endorse or recommend any particular certification seal. Any food that uses a third party certification seal must meet the FDA labeling requirements at a minimum. Typically the standards for certification seals are stricter than the FDA requirements.
  • The label format is left up to food makers; the FDA does not have a mandated design or any requirements for where the gluten-free label has to be placed.
  • Food makers can continue to use the terms, “made with no gluten containing ingredients” and “not made with gluten containing ingredients.” If the terms are used in conjunction with a gluten-free label, the product must meet the FDA standard. If the terms are used without a gluten-free label, the FDA says, “consumers should not assume the food meets all FDA requirements.”
  • Food makers can continue to use advisory statements such as, “Made in a factory that also processes wheat products” on a food that also has a gluten-free label. The FDA says it will need to “look at foods on a case by case basis to determine whether a specific advisory statement with a gluten-free claim would be misleading.” Any product with the advisory statement and gluten-free label would have to meet the FDA requirements.
  • Naturally gluten-free foods can be labeled gluten free. This is a change from the proposed rules which would have prohibited the gluten-free label on inherently gluten-free foods including gluten-free grains and products like bottled water unless the label also said all foods of the same type were also gluten free. The final rule addresses concerns that some gluten-free grains, legumes and seeds have a high risk of cross-contamination. A gluten-free label on these kinds of products “provide the expectation that any gluten is less than 20 ppm,” the FDA says.
  • Gluten-free labeling continues to be voluntary so even products that are gluten free may not be labeled as such. This is likely to come up most often with naturally gluten-free products with a low risk of cross-contamination, fruits and vegetables for example. The lack of a gluten-free label does not mean the food contains gluten.

Why Should I Eat Organic? Reasons Why You Should Eat Organic…

Importance of Organic Foods

Organic Foods – Nutrient Density

Simply stated, nutrient density means how many nutrients you get from a food, given the number of calories it contains. Nutrient density is a simple way to connect nutrients with calories.

– World’s Healthiest Foods

What’s In Organic Foods?

Higher Nutrient Content

More Vitamins & Minerals per Calorie

More Essential Fatty Acids & Amino Acids per Calorie

More Antioxidants per Calorie

What’s Not in Organic Foods?

*Acetylcholine Esterase Inhibitors

Acetylcholine

Acetylcholine is the body’s most predominant neurotransmitter.

Essential for Memory Recall & Quick Thinking

Nutrient Density: Organic Legumes, Vegetables, Fruits

Acetylcholine Esterase

Acetylcholine Esterase is the enzyme that clears the neurosynaptic junction allowing for the next impulse to come.

This is an especially important cycle for inhaling/exhaling during respiration and the contractions and relaxations of the heart muscle.

◦Thus Pesticides have an adverse effect upon the Lungs & Heart.

List of Banned Chemicals

http://scorecard.goodguide.com/chemical-groups/one-list.tcl?short_list_name=brpest

Consequently, “The nutritive value of crops and their ability to handle pests and diseases is diminished.” The bottom line, Kittredge says, is, “across the board, our foodstuffs are less nutritious than they were. It’s well documented. Between 1940 and 2009, in a basic salad, USDA records show a 55-70 percent decrease in mineral levels.” – Remineralize the Earth

We identified 191 matched pairs with valid comparisons of antioxidant, vitamin and mineral levels. Of these, 119 organic samples within the matched pairs had higher nutrient levels, or 62% of the total matched pairs.

◦State of Science Review: Nutritional Superiority of Organic Foods – Charles Benbrook, Xin Zhao, Jaime Yáñez, Neal Davies and Preston Andrews- www.orgain-center.org 53 pages