Old Label vs. New labeling on food-FDA Announement


Old vs New Label – What’s Different?
While much of the new label’s look isn’t drastically different from the old label, the information and layout have been revamped. According to the FDA’s announcement, the most notable differences between the old and new label include:
* Increasing the type size for “Calories,” “servings per container,” and the “Serving size” declaration, and bolding the number of calories and the “Serving size” declaration to highlight this information.
* Requiring manufacturers to declare the actual amount, in addition to percent Daily Value of vitamin D, calcium, iron and potassium. (They can voluntarily declare the gram amount for other vitamins and minerals.)
* Changing the footnote to better explain what percent Daily Value means. It will read: “*The % Daily Value tells you how much a nutrient in a serving of food contributes to a daily diet. 2,000 calories a day is used for general nutrition advice.”
* Adding the “Added Sugars” declaration directly beneath the listing for “Total Sugars.”
* Removing “Calories from Fat” because research shows the type of fat is more important than the amount.
* Serving sizes must be based on amounts of foods and beverages that people are actually eating, not what they should be eating.

Image source: U.S. Food and Drug Administration
Now that you have a better understanding of the new label, let’s discuss some labeling strategies you can use to meet these label requirements without causing major disruptions to your business.
Label Tips for Manufacturers
Updating your labels can be a pain but with some planning, it can be a much easier process. Below are some suggestions to help you get started on your path to FDA label compliance:
* Mask old info with cover-up labels: Also known as “block out labels,” this unique label material allows you the ability to completely cover up the old Nutrition Facts while continuing to use the last of your label inventory.
* Embrace a new label look: Updating labels with the new Nutrition Facts can be the perfect opportunity to evaluate your current label design and try something new or make improvements.

Gluten-free food labels under new FDA rules

Gluten-free food labels under new FDA rules

* The terms, “gluten free,” “no gluten,” “free of gluten” and “without gluten” can be used on labels of foods that meet the FDA gluten-free standard.
* No universal symbol will appear on packages to indicate that a food meets the FDA gluten-free standard. If a food company wants to indicate that a product meets the standard, it has to use one of the gluten-free terms.
* Certification seals from third parties, for example a seal from the Gluten Free Certification Organization, can continue to be used on labels. The FDA says it does not endorse or recommend any particular certification seal. Any food that uses a third party certification seal must meet the FDA labeling requirements at a minimum. Typically the standards for certification seals are stricter than the FDA requirements.
* The label format is left up to food makers; the FDA does not have a mandated design or any requirements for where the gluten-free label has to be placed.
* Food makers can continue to use the terms, “made with no gluten containing ingredients” and “not made with gluten containing ingredients.” If the terms are used in conjunction with a gluten-free label, the product must meet the FDA standard. If the terms are used without a gluten-free label, the FDA says, “consumers should not assume the food meets all FDA requirements.”
* Food makers can continue to use advisory statements such as, “Made in a factory that also processes wheat products” on a food that also has a gluten-free label. The FDA says it will need to “look at foods on a case by case basis to determine whether a specific advisory statement with a gluten-free claim would be misleading.” Any product with the advisory statement and gluten-free label would have to meet the FDA requirements.
* Naturally gluten-free foods can be labeled gluten free. This is a change from the proposed rules which would have prohibited the gluten-free label on inherently gluten-free foods including gluten-free grains and products like bottled water unless the label also said all foods of the same type were also gluten free. The final rule addresses concerns that some gluten-free grains, legumes and seeds have a high risk of cross-contamination. A gluten-free label on these kinds of products “provide the expectation that any gluten is less than 20 ppm,” the FDA says.
* Gluten-free labeling continues to be voluntary so even products that are gluten free may not be labeled as such. This is likely to come up most often with naturally gluten-free products with a low risk of cross-contamination, fruits and vegetables for example. The lack of a gluten-free label does not mean the food contains gluten.

Gluten Free Guide – New Rules under the FDA

Gluten-free food labels under new FDA rules

  • The terms, “gluten free,” “no gluten,” “free of gluten” and “without gluten” can be used on labels of foods that gluten freemeet the FDA gluten-free standard.
  • No universal symbol will appear on packages to indicate that a food meets the FDA gluten-free standard. If a food company wants to indicate that a product meets the standard, it has to use one of the gluten-free terms.
  • Certification seals from third parties, for example a seal from the Gluten Free Certification Organization, can continue to be used on labels. The FDA says it does not endorse or recommend any particular certification seal. Any food that uses a third party certification seal must meet the FDA labeling requirements at a minimum. Typically the standards for certification seals are stricter than the FDA requirements.
  • The label format is left up to food makers; the FDA does not have a mandated design or any requirements for where the gluten-free label has to be placed.
  • Food makers can continue to use the terms, “made with no gluten containing ingredients” and “not made with gluten containing ingredients.” If the terms are used in conjunction with a gluten-free label, the product must meet the FDA standard. If the terms are used without a gluten-free label, the FDA says, “consumers should not assume the food meets all FDA requirements.”
  • Food makers can continue to use advisory statements such as, “Made in a factory that also processes wheat products” on a food that also has a gluten-free label. The FDA says it will need to “look at foods on a case by case basis to determine whether a specific advisory statement with a gluten-free claim would be misleading.” Any product with the advisory statement and gluten-free label would have to meet the FDA requirements.
  • Naturally gluten-free foods can be labeled gluten free. This is a change from the proposed rules which would have prohibited the gluten-free label on inherently gluten-free foods including gluten-free grains and products like bottled water unless the label also said all foods of the same type were also gluten free. The final rule addresses concerns that some gluten-free grains, legumes and seeds have a high risk of cross-contamination. A gluten-free label on these kinds of products “provide the expectation that any gluten is less than 20 ppm,” the FDA says.
  • Gluten-free labeling continues to be voluntary so even products that are gluten free may not be labeled as such. This is likely to come up most often with naturally gluten-free products with a low risk of cross-contamination, fruits and vegetables for example. The lack of a gluten-free label does not mean the food contains gluten.