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What is Hashimoto’s Thyroiditis?

Hashimoto’s Thyroiditis

Hashimoto thyroiditis is the most common form of thyroid gland inflammation (thyroiditis) and the most frequent cause of decreased thyroid hormone production hypothyroidism. It results from an autoimmune disorder, an attack on the thyroid gland by a person’s own immune system.
The thyroid gland is a butterfly-shaped organ that lies flat against the windpipe in the throat. It produces the hormones thyroxine (T4) and triiodothyronine (T3) and plays an important role in controlling the body’s metabolism.
With Hashimoto thyroiditis, the thyroid becomes enlarged, called a goiter. Thyroid gland tissue is slowly destroyed by white blood cells called lymphocytes that move into the thyroid gland and by one or more thyroid autoantibodies. This causes a progressive decrease in the production of thyroid hormones.
About 1 in 1,000 people are diagnosed annually with Hashimoto thyroiditis, and the number has been increasing over time due to improvements in diagnostic techniques. This disorder can affect anyone at any age but occurs most commonly in women who are between 30 and 50 years of age. The ratio of women to men diagnosed with the disease is 20 to 1. People with a family history of thyroid diseases or with other autoimmune diseases, especially type 1 diabetes or adrenal insufficiency are at increased risk.
Those affected by Hashimoto thyroiditis may not have any symptoms for several years, but eventually most will experience some degree of hypothyroidism that worsens over time.

Signs and Symptoms
Constipation
Depression
Dry skin
Fatigue
Forgetfulness
Increased sensitivity to cold
Menstrual irregularities, heavy and excessive bleeding
Muscle and joint pain
Muscle weakness
Sluggishness
Thinning hair
Weight gain
For pregnant women, increased risk of miscarriage

Tests
Testing is done to evaluate the health of the thyroid, diagnose Hashimoto thyroiditis, and monitor treatment.
To determine whether the thyroid is functioning properly and for monitoring thyroid function and hormone production, one or more of the following blood tests may be done:
Thyroid-stimulating hormone (TSH) – typically elevated in hypothyroidism
Free T4 – often decreased in primary hypothyroidism
Total or Free T3 – sometimes decreased but may be within the normal reference range, so is not as useful as free T4
Additional tests may be used to detect autoantibodies directed against the thyroid and to help diagnose Hashimoto thyroiditis:
Anti-thyroid peroxidase antibody (anti-TPO, see Thyroid Antibodies) – this test detects the presence of autoantibodies against a protein found in thyroid cells. A high value usually indicates autoimmune damage to the thyroid due to disorders such as Hashimoto thyroiditis and Graves disease.
Antithyroglobulin antibody (TgAb) – if positive, may indicate Hashimoto thyroiditis; while thyroglobulin antibodies are often positive, they are not as sensitive or specificas anti-TPO so they are not routinely ordered.
People with a very mild form of Hashimoto thyroiditis may not have thyroid antibodies present in their blood.
Treatment
There is no cure for Hashimoto thyroiditis, but the disorder is manageable. No treatment is required when thyroid hormone concentrations (T4 and T3) are normal and the affected person is not experiencing significant symptoms. Thyroid hormone replacement therapy is typically necessary, however, when thyroid hormone production becomes significantly decreased and symptoms begin to emerge or worsen. Those with Hashimoto thyroiditis are closely monitored, and thyroid hormone replacement therapy is initiated and/or adjusted as necessary.

https://medlineplus.gov/ency/article/000371.htm

Urinary tract Info and Suggested Natural healing approach

Urinary tract Info:
Commonly also call bladder infections. There is a disturbance in the bacterial flora that protects the urinary track and anabiotic’s lead to reoccurring infections.

Doubling probiotics such as L. Acidophilus is highly recommended. At least 20 billion CFU’s. 50-100Billion CFU’s would be more beneficial and HIGHLY recommended.

Acidity levels are too high in the body when the pH is disrupted there is fermentation of vaginal glycogen to lactic acid. Alkalinity is Key, must add more Green into the diet. ORGANIC EATING is SO Very IMPORTANT!!!

Eliminating of dairy, yeast, and soy products are recommended to rebalance pH. Limiting grains, sugar, caffeine, and alcohol, and refined carbohydrates.
At least 64 oz water a day. Decaffeinated tea counts as water. Eliminate food allergens. Allergy Blood work is your best Road map to gut and immune support and healing.  Blood Tests are available and easy!

Recommended foods:
Use healthy cooking oil such as olive oil (don’t heat olive oil) or coconut oil.
Eat Less red meats and more lean meats such as fish, but no soy.
High fiber foods include beans root vegetables such as yams or sweet potatoes and psyllium husk.
Antioxidant rich foods including vegetables like bell peppers and squash.
**Fruit in the morning including cranberries, blueberries,and cherries. If you’re going to drink juice make sure that it is unsweetened. Please eat your fruit, better for you unless you are juicing. Best for digestion if fruit is first thing in the morning and by itself or for your first snack, eaten alone.**

Recommended Vitamins:
Probiotics and digestive enzymes ALWAYS!! Double if taking antibiotics!
Multi Vitamin
Vit D: 2000-4000 IU
Fish oils 1000mg and or Flax seed, 3x a day. Could go up to 6000mg
Super Greens
Amino Acids
Vit C: 1000mg a day
Grape seed oil 100-300mg
Magnesium 200-300mg 3x a day
Zinc: 30mg a day

Recommended Botanicals:
Cranberry
Aloe Vera: up to 32oz per day
Gotu Kola is great extract tea to help balance pH. 60-120mg
Uva Ursi ( upland cranberry or bearberry) is a powerful antiseptic herb.
Dried leaves or tea: 1.5-4.0 (1-2 tsp)
Goldenseal herb has antimicrobial agents. Dried root or tea: 1-2g

Other herbs that are recommended: green tea, cats claw, milk thistle, and reishi mushroom.