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Understanding Auto Immune disorders

Who understands auto immune disorders and how they affects us and our loved ones?  Here is a brief overview of what it is and a link if you want to research correct information further.

When an intruder invades your body—like a cold virus or bacteria on a thorn that pricks your skin—your immune system protects you. It tries to identify, kill, and eliminate the invaders that might hurt you. But sometimes problems with your immune system cause it to mistake your body’s own healthy cells as invaders and then repeatedly attacks them. This is called an autoimmune disease. (“Autoimmune” means immunity against the self.)

Autoimmune diseases can affect almost any part of the body, including the heart, brain, nerves, muscles, skin, eyes, joints, lungs, kidneys, glands, the digestive tract, and blood vessels. The classic sign of an autoimmune disease is inflammation, which can cause redness, heat, pain, and swelling. How an autoimmune disease affects you depends on what part of the body is targeted. If the disease affects the joints, as in rheumatoid arthritis, you might have joint pain, stiffness, and loss of function. If it affects the thyroid, as in Graves’ disease and thyroiditis, it might cause tiredness, weight gain, and muscle aches. If it attacks the skin, as it does in scleroderma/systemic sclerosis, vitiligo, and systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE), it can cause rashes, blisters, and color changes.

Many autoimmune diseases don’t restrict themselves to one part of the body. For example, SLE can affect the skin, joints, kidneys, heart, nerves, blood vessels, and more. Type 1 diabetes can affect your glands, eyes, kidneys, muscles, and more.

KEY WORDS

Acquired immune system. The part of the immune system that develops as a person grows. It employs antibodies and immune cells to fight harmful substances.

Antibody. A special protein produced by the body’s immune system that recognizes and helps fight infectious agents and other foreign substances that invade the body.

Antigen. A foreign substance that triggers the production of antibodies when it is introduced into the body.

Autoimmune disease. A disease that results when the immune system mistakenly attacks the body’s own tissues.

Corticosteroids. Potent anti-inflammatory hormones that are made naturally in the body or synthetically (man-made) for use as drugs. They are also called glucocorticoids. The most commonly prescribed drug of this type is prednisone.

Diabetes, type 1. A condition in which the immune system destroys insulin-producing cells of the pancreas, making it impossible for the body to use glucose (blood sugar) for energy. Type 1 diabetes usually occurs in children and young adults.

Graves’ disease. An autoimmune disease of the thyroid gland that results in the overproduction of thyroid hormone. This causes such symptoms as nervousness, heat intolerance, heart palpitations, and unexplained weight loss.

Immune system. A complex network of specialized cells and organs that work together to defend the body against attacks by foreign invaders, such as bacteria and viruses.

Thyroiditis. An inflammation of the thyroid gland that causes the gland to become underactive. This results in symptoms such as fatigue, weakness, weight gain, cold intolerance, and muscle aches.

Vitiligo. A disorder in which the immune system destroys pigment-making cells called melanocytes. This results in white patches of skin on different parts of the body.

The National Institutes of Health (NIH)—The Nation’s Medical Research Agency—includes 27 Institutes and Centers and is a component of the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services. It is the primary Federal agency for conducting and supporting basic, clinical, and translational medical research, and it investigates the causes, treatments, and cures for both common and rare diseases. For more information about NIH visit:

https://www.niams.nih.gov/Health_Info/

Collagen I and III Dietary Supplement

Collagen I and III Dietary Supplement
Collagen M.D.
7oz $18.95


Collagen Type I & III together account for 90%
of the collagen present in the dermis with up to
60-80% for Collagen Type I and 15-20% for
Collagen Type III. This collection of fibers is
responsible for maintaining the structure and
resistance of tissues and constitutes a dynamic
network which anchors the skin in the deeper
layers, thereby creating a support base for the
skin. In addition to its architectural properties,
collagen also regulates the activity of fibroblasts,
playing a role in their migration, proliferation and
differentiation, and in their adhesion to various
elements of the extracellular matrix.
Collagen Type I & III are the main components
of hair, nails, ligaments, tendons, muscles, gums,
teeth, bones, blood vessels and eyes.

In 6oz of water or juice, blend 2 scoops of powder (over 35 years old) or 1 scoop (under 35 years old) or as directed by your physician. Use juice containing Vitamin C or take with a Vitamin C supplement for maximum collagen support.
For optimal nutritional benefits, take on an empty stomach and wait 20 minutes before eating
Do not add to milk or other protein dinks/powders as this will decrease the benefits. May be take with other vitamins and minerals.

Collagen Type I & II …6.6g
Collagen Type I and III protein peptides 
derived from 100% pure bovine collagen.

Contains no gluten, dairy sucrose, starch, yeast, wheat, corn, cholesterol, fat, additives, colorings, flavorings or preservatives.

Rutabaga Sweet Potato Soup Recipe

rutabaga

Rutabaga Sweet Potato Soup

Vegan, Gluten Free

Happily Serves 4

ALL ORGANIC INGREDIENTS

1 butternut squash, cut in half

3 garlic cloves

2 cups rutabaga, peeled and diced

2 cups sweet potato, peeled and diced

Coconut Oil

1 tsp. Sea salt

½ tsp pepper

1 Yellow onion, chopped

¾ Cup soaked cashews

2½ Cups Coconut milk

2 Cups vegetable or chicken broth

½ tsp nutmeg

1 tsp thyme

Directions

Preheat oven to 400º .

Rub the squash with oil and place cut-side down on a baking sheet.

Cut garlic and let sit 5-10 mins.

Coat the rutabaga and sweet potato in oil and sprinkle with salt and pepper.

Add both to baking sheet. Bake for 50-60 minutes, rotate half way through.

Sauté onion and garlic until soft and caramelized.

Remove roasted veggies from oven and blend all of the above in a food processor until smooth. The nuts may remain grainy, but that’s okay. You can add water to reach desired consistency.

Rutabagas Nutrition Facts

Serving Size: 3.5 ounces (100 grams), raw

Calories 39

Calories from fat 2

Total fat 0 g 0%

Saturated fat 0 g 0%

Trans fat

Cholesterol 0 mg 0%

Sodium 20 mg 1%

Total Carbohydrate 9 g 3%

Dietary Fiber 2 g 7%

Sugar 6 g

Protein 1 g

Vitamin A 0% Vitamin C 31%  Calcium 5% Iron 3%

Health Benefits of Rutabagas

All crucifers (brassicas or cole crops) are high in antioxidant and anti-cancer compounds. The anti-cancer properties of these vegetables are so well established that the American Cancer Society recommends that Americans increase their intake of cruciferous vegetables.

Rutabaga’s most significant nutrient comes from vitamin C. One cup contains 53% of the daily recommended value, providing antioxidants and immune system-supporting functions that help protect the cells from free radical damage. Although rutabagas provide only 5% of the iron needed for healthy blood on a daily basis, vitamin C enhances its absorption, while helping to form both collagen and the thyroid hormone thyroxine, which protect cells against damage, encourage wounds to heal, fight infections, and promote healthy bones, teeth, gums, and blood vessels.

Beta-carotene-rich rutabagas are also an excellent source of potassium and manganese (for energy), and a good source of fiber, thiamin, vitamin B6 (helps support the nervous system), calcium (for strong bones), magnesium (helps absorb calcium and combat stress), and phosphorus (helps metabolize proteins and sugars).