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Is Chewing Gum Bad for You? (One Ingredient Is Linked to Gut Destruction)

Disturbing side effects of chewing gum.  Alternative bad breathe ideas and reasons why you should rethink putting gum in your mouth.
Gut Destruction

Chewing gum manufacturers have been turning to an ingredient called titanium dioxide for years. Now used in nanoparticle form, this extremely tiny metal compound is posing some serious emerging health threats. This is probably the scariest reason to avoid gum.

Generally recognized as safe by the Food and Drug Administration, this compound is often used in nanoparticle form to create a bright white pigmentation in paints, plastics … and chewing gum. (2) It’s also found in tons of other foods, like candies and powdered white sugar (donuts!) and even bread. Although it’s allowed on store shelves and considered safe, scientists are starting to paint a different picture.

In fact, a 2017 study published in the journal NanoImpact shows that nano-titanium oxide ingredients like titanium dioxide can severely impact gut health. Researchers exposed small intestinal cells to a meal’s worth of nanoparticles over four hours (acute exposure) or three meal’s worth over five days (chronic exposure). What they found is a bit shocking.

Chronic exposure to titanium dioxide nanoparticles in the diet:

Weakened the intestinal barrier
Slowed down metabolism
Triggered inflammation
Weakened the gut’s defense against pathogens

Blocked nutrient absorption of key nutrients like iron, zinc and fatty acids
The nanoparticles actually blunted the effectiveness of the small intestines’ microvilli. Microvilli are tiny projections that jut off of small intestinal cells and work to absorb nutrients our bodies need to survive. (3)

People also face this type of titanium dioxide exposure through toothpaste, and it’s even sometimes used to created a smoother texture in chocolates and to create a brighter appearance in skim milk.

In 2012, Arizona State University found that titanium dioxide nanoparticles turned up in five percent of products tested, including Twinkies and mayonnaise samples. Under public pressure, Dunkin Donuts stopped using nano-titanium dioxide in its donuts’ powdered sugar in 2015.

“To avoid foods rich in titanium oxide nanoparticles you should avoid processed foods, and especially candy. That is where you see a lot of nanoparticles,” — Gretchen Mahler, PhD, study co-author and assistant professor of biomedical engineering at Binghamton University, State University of New York. (4)

Beyond that, many chewing gum products contain emulsifiers to retain flavor and keep gum from sticking to your teeth. (5) The trouble is, many emulsifiers act almost like detergent in your digestive tract, throwing off the natural balance of your gut flora. In fact, research in lab animals suggests certain emulsifiers used as food additives could contribute to colon cancer development.

Is Chewing Gum Bad? More Reasons to Stop

Migraines

For children and adolescents dealing with vicious migraines and tension headaches, the natural solution could be right under their noses: Stop chewing gum. A small study published in Pediatric Neurology discovered that nixing gum led to significant improvements in 26 out of 30 adolescents in the study. Amazingly, 19 of them experienced complete headache resolution. No pills, no treatments — they just stopped chewing gum. (6)

If you’re trying to figure out how to get rid of a migraine naturally, your gum habit is a great place to start. In tweens and teens, common proven headache triggers include stress, lack of sleep, hot weather, video games, noise, sunlight, smoking, skipping meals and menstruation. Now we can add gum to the list. Researchers aren’t sure if it’s the artificial sweeteners or a TMJ issue related to gum and headaches, but the good news is we can stop many headaches with this simple step. (7)

Sinister Sweeteners

You’d expect fake sweeteners like aspartame in diet soda, but chewing gum? Come on! Different chewing gum companies turn to ingredients like aspartame, sorbitol, high-fructose corn syrup, acesulfame K, sucrolose and xylitol. Some actually use multiple fake sweeteners in a single gum product.

These ingredients are linked to serious health issues like tooth decay, liver fat buildup, type 2 diabetes, heart disease, leukemia, lymphoma, kidney tumors and more. Acesulfame potassium, also known as acesulfame K, is among the most common artificial sweeteners detected in breast milk. That’s troubling, since the ingredient is also linked to thyroid dysfunction. Sucralose harms the gut, throwing off healthy levels of enzymes and disrupting the microbiome. (8)

While xylitol and sorbitol may seem more natural, these processed sugar alcohols aren’t absorbed well by the body and cause an allergic reaction for those who have a sensitivity to it. And then there are the digestive sugar alcohol and xylitol side effects, including bloating, gas, cramping and diarrhea. And get this: Its laxative effect is so pronounced that it’s actually part of the chemical makeup for many over-the-counter laxatives.

Special note to dog owners: Xylitol and other sugar alcohol-based sweeteners are life-threatening toxins to dogs. Be mindful of breath mints, candies, sugar-free gum, frozen desserts and other foods when your pets are around. (9)

Better Bad-Breath Fighters & Gum Alternatives

Bad breath is a good excuse to reach for gum, but as you can see, the side effects are bad news, especially for your gut. Luckily, there are better ways to cope. After ruling out potential underlying issues for bad breath, you can turn to these things to naturally improve your breath:

Eat parsley.
Drink enough water, especially tap into the benefits of lemon water.
Learn how to safely tap into peppermint oil benefits.(Not recommended for young children.)
Learn about oil pulling with coconut oil.
Avoid grains and added sugars.
Final Thoughts on ‘Is Chewing Gum Bad for You?’
American played a huge role in spreading the popularity of chewing gum all around the world.
However, today’s ingredients include fake dyes and flavors. But perhaps most concerning is nanoparticle-sized titanium dioxide, an ingredient used in everything from gum, candy and bread to paint and plastics.
Nano-titanium dioxide helps create a vibrant white color, but scientists now show that it can impact small intestinal cells in a way that blocks absorption of key nutrients, slows the metabolism, increases inflammation and weakens the gut’s ability to protect against dangerous pathogens.
Chewing gum is also linked to migraines and tension headaches in children and adolescents.
There are still some chewing gum companies that rely on old-fashioned, real-food ingredients, but they are sometimes harder to come by.

Source: www.draxe.com

ReCap: Cutting Board Education Night

If you missed the Local education night here is a few things we discussed:

Muscle building with Plant Protein
*How do you support a body on a plant based diet without eating meat?

Earth is the ultimate prism. Every green plant captures a different wavelength of light and energy from the sun. A collection of juices from sea plants, field grasses and garden vegetables will alkalize your body, build up your blood, and cleanse your cells.

What is a Carbohydrate? Fruit, vegetable, starch, grain, pasta
What is a Protein? Animal meat, dairy
What is a Fat? Nut, seed or oil

How Much do we need daily? Age/Gender/Health History
Carbs: Weight loss must be under 50g a day, aim for no more than 30g of carbs at a meal and 8g of sugars within those carbs. Think higher fiber foods.
Protein: 1g per 1kg body weight (think about half your body weight)
Fat: 25-30% daily calories can come from the pure sources of healthy fats.

***Ratios are different for everyone and Should be evaluated by a Certified Health Professional or Holistic Professional based on your health history.***

What are Amino Acids? What do they do?
Assists with the stabilization or recovery of muscle strength, endurance, and volume
Helps keep body tissues firm
Helps minimize body fat
May support a weight loss regimen
Aid in normalizing protein synthesis

If the essential amino acids are not present in the daily diet the body will break down existing proteins in order to supply the body with the missing amino acids.

Essential Amino Acids:
Cannot be produced in our body and thus must be consumed in our diets. The essential amino acids humans cannot synthesize are:
Phenylalanine, valine, threonine, tryptophan, methionine, leucine, isoleucine, lysine, and histidine. (Arginine is mostly required in young children and not as important as adults)

Non-Essential Amino Acids: These can be synthesized by the body.
Proteins drive ALL functions of the various organs of the human body.
Alanine (from pyruvic acid)
Arginine (from glutamic acid)
Asparagine (from aspartic acid)
Aspartic Acid (from oxaloacetic acid)
Cysteine
Glutamic Acid (from oxoglutaric acid)
Glutamine (from glutamic acid)
Glycine (from serine and threonine)
Proline (from glutamic acid)
Serine (from glucose)
Tyrosine (from phenylalanine)

If you fail to obtain even just one out of the essential amino acids, your body’s proteins so not complete and the body is forced to steal from bones and elsewhere to create metabolic processes in your body. Also, unlike fats and carbohydrates, your body does not store excess supplies of amino acids for later use – you need a regular supply of them everyday.

Foods with amino acids include animal and vegetable sources. Most of the animal sources such as meat, eggs and milk are considered to be “complete protein sources” meaning that these contain all the essential amino acids that your body needs.
Vegetables are also good amino acid food sources but most of them do not usually contain all essential aminos.

Amino Acid Deficiency and Supplementation
Many people who are sick, fatigued, or trying weight loss programs, vegetarians or Vegans consume insufficient amounts of protein. Thus, supplementation of amino acids has been increasingly necessary. B6 and B12 are the most common of deficiencies when not consuming animal protein.

Non Meat Forms of Amino Acids: Think SEA LIFE!
*How can I combat muscle fatigue or just plain being tired all the time?
More GREEN foods create energy in the body! How do plants grow? They need sun, water, rest, minerals and vitamins, and time.

Antioxidant Rich foods: EAT FROM THE RAINBOW!
RED: Lycopene
YELLOW/ORANGE: Beta Carotene & Beta Crytoxanthin
BLUE/PURPLE: Anthocyanins
GREEN: Chlorophyll

GREEN FOOD BASICS:
*Green foods have a high content of chlorophyll due to porphyrin rings.
* Chlorophyll and heme units of red blood cells are virtually identical except the center molecule
* Chlorophyll-magnesium
* Heme-Iron
* Heme units are the building blocks for red blood cells
* Therefore, all green foods help the body to create new blood.

*How do we use food as medicine so we can fuel the body, heal and repair?
Basic Weight management Strategies and Lifestyle Strategies
1-Adequate ATP
2-Nutrient Density-Organic Foods. **A MUST!!!**
3-Balance-60-80% Alkalizing (pH Balance)
4-Moderation-Limited Refined Sugar
5-Calorie Control=Calorie Restriction
6-Variety= Seasonal Eating VS Emotional Eating
Refer to www.healthywithjodi.com for my Sweet 16 Eating Healthy Guidelines and how to achieve balance.

Definitions and menu DeCoding:
Vegan: A strict vegetarian who consumes no products from an animal, such as meat eggs or dairy products or stains from using animal products such as the leather.
Vegetarian: does not eat or believe in eating meat, fish, Fowl or any food drive from animals such as eggs or cheese. Uses fruits, vegetables, and grains for food sources.
Paleo: consume vegetables, fruits, nuts, lean meats, no grains, no processed foods.
Pescatarians: do not eat any land animals or birds such as beef pork chicken or turkey. Will eat fish and other seafood such as shrimp and clams. They do eat fruits, vegetables, beans, greens and nuts.
Lacto vegetarian: includes vegetables and dairy products such as milk, cheese, yogurt, butter, ghee, cream, Keefer but excludes eggs.

Food Catagories: Do you now what you are eating and how to combine them? (Just a few listed below)

Whole Grain, Gluten
Tamari, Coconut Aminos, Soy Sauce
Flax Seed, Chia Seed, hemp hearts, Tahini
Hummus, lentils, Tofu, beans
Nut Meat, Nut Milk, Quinoa
Micro greens, Sprouts

Spices: parts of the plant other than the leafy bit such as the root, stem, Bulb, bark or seeds ex: cinnamon, cloves, ginger and pepper.
Herbs: come from the leafy and green part of the plant. Ex: Basil, oregano, rosemary, Parsley, mint.
Spices and herbs add MAJOR nutrients to your meals, you can achieve therapeutic ranges when you use ORGANIC spices/herbs daily. Www.superfoodly.com

*What do I pair together to equal complete protein meal?
A nut or seed plus a legume equals a complete Protein.

BASIC PROTEIN NUTRITION INFO:**Even though you are worried about getting enough protein, you need to watch the Carbohydrate content of your meal. **
1/2 cup beans: average 7g protein Black, 7g protein garbanzo (20g carbs) 120 cal
1 small sweet potato: Not a nightshade 2g protein (22g carbs) 95 cal
1/2 cup yam: 2g protein (22g carb) ROOT Vegetable 95 cal
1/2 cup lentils (Legumes): average 9g protein (20g carb) 7g fiber
1/4cup Quinoa equals a cup cooked: 6g protein (29g carbs) 160 cal.
HAS ALL 9 ESSENTIAL AA
1 TBSP or 1/8cup nuts: walnuts: 2g protein (1g carb) 90cal
1 TBSP seeds: flax seeds: 3g protein (7g carb) 60 cal
1/2 cup brown rice: 5g protein (23g carbs) 150 cal
1/2 cup Black Rice: 10 LESS carbs than brown rice
4oz Tofu: 9g protein (3g carbs) 90cal
1/2 cup Soy beans: 14g (9g carbs) 150 cal
1 cup Avocado: balanced Meal!!! 3g protein (11g carbs) 7g fiber 22g fat 250 cal

Organic Label Guide – What to look for in Organic Labels.

organic

Certified Organic Label Guide

Source:   Organic.org

Making sense of organic labeling can be difficult, and many consumers do not understand the significance of the USDA Organic label. Since October 21, 2002, the following guidelines were established by the United States Department of Agriculture’s (USDA) National Organic Program (NOP) to assure consumers know the exact organic content of the food they buy.

Single-Ingredient Foods

On foods like fruits and vegetables, look for a small sticker version of the USDA Organic label or check the signage in your produce section for this seal.

The word “organic” and the seal may also appear on packages of meat, cartons of milk or eggs, cheese, and other single-ingredient foods.

Multi-Ingredient Foods

Foods such as beverages, snacks, and other processed foods use the following classification system to indicate their use of organic ingredients.

100% Organic—Foods bearing this label are made with 100% organic ingredients* and may display the USDA Organic seal.

Organic—These products contain at least 95–99% organic ingredients (by weight). The remaining ingredients are not available organically but have been approved by the NOP. These products may display the USDA Organic seal.

Made With Organic Ingredients—Food packaging that reads “Made With Organic Ingredients” must contain 70–94% organic ingredients. These products will not bear the USDA Organic seal; instead, they may list up to three ingredients on the front of the packaging.

Other—Products with less than 70% organic ingredients may only list organic ingredients on the information panel of the packaging. These products will not bear the USDA Organic seal.

Keep in mind that even if a producer is certified organic, the use of the USDA Organic label is voluntary. At the same time, not everyone goes through the rigorous process of becoming certified, especially smaller farming operations. When shopping at a farmers’ market, for example, don’t hesitate to ask the vendors how your food was grown.

*Salt and water are not included.