Obesity Facts

Food for thought as you prepare for the super bowl today? The alarming rates of Obesity need to published and talked about.  Everyone wants to “live in the moment” But we are stealing precious moments due to our repeated poor food choices.  If you want to be around to outlive your kids, and you want to be the fun mom or fun grandparent that can keep up with the kids we need to educate ourselves and start making better choices to make that happen.

You can do it.  We can do it, and I can help!

Obesity facts:

Today, about 75% of US men and 67% of US women are either overweight or obese. Between 1988 and 1994, 63% of men and 55% of US women were overweight or obese.

The NHANES says that about 35% of men and 37% of women are obese, 40% of men and 30% of women are overweight. 2/3 of US adults are at a unhealthy weight.

US Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) shows that Americans have been gaining weight since the 1960’s. The average US woman weighs about 166 pounds compared to 140 in 1960. 166 was the average for a man in 1960.
Our children are not expected to outlive us. Obesity is one of the biggest contributors to this shortened life expectancy, it is the root of a lot of chronic health conditions.

Our environment contributes in some of the following ways:
Overuse of antibiotics in food production and medicine
Growth-enhancing drugs used in food animals
Endocrine-disrupting chemicals and pesticides
Social media centered around junk food and artificial sweeteners.
Highly processed genetically modified (GM) foods are full of ingredients that contribute to metabolic dysfunction and weight gain/obesity.

The McKinsey Global Institute says the annual global cost of obesity is now $2 trillion. (For comparison, alcoholism costs are $1.4 trillion annually, road accidents cost $700 billion, and unsafe sex costs $300 billion)  The McKinsey report estimates that nearly 1/2 of the world’s adult population will be overweight or obese by 2030.

In the US, 8 obesity related diseases account for 75% of healthcare costs. These include type 2 diabetes, heart disease, dementia, cancer, Polycystic ovarian syndrome, hypertension, lipid problems, NAFLD (nonalcoholic fatty liver disease).

The National Health Expenditure Accounts (NHEA) are the official estimates of total health care spending in the US. In 1960, the NHEA measures annual U.S. expenditures for health care goods and services, public health activities, government administration, the net cost of health insurance, and investment related to health care.
U.S. health care spending in 2014 reached $3.0 trillion or $9,523 per person.
The nation’s Gross Domestic Product accounted for 17.5% of health care costs.

cms.gov/research-statistics-data-and-systems/statistics-trends-and-reports/nationalhealthexpenddata/nationalhealthaccountshistorical.html
http://www.medicinenet.com/script/main/art.asp?articlekey=189100
http://www.surgeongeneral.gov/library/calls/
http://articles.mercola.com/sites/articles/archive/2015/07/08/increasing-us-adult-weight.aspx
http://www.medicinenet.com/script/main/art.asp?articlekey=189100
http://atlanta.cbslocal.com/2015/06/15/cdc-average-american-woman-now-weighs-as-much-as-1960s-us-man/
http://archinte.jamanetwork.com/article.aspx?articleid=2323411

How Much Sugar – Can You Have? Did You Have? Should You Have? How to Calculate it.

sugar

How Much Sugar is Too Much?

Calculating Refined Sugar Intake In Teaspoons sugar

  • A healthy adult human being has approximately 5 liters of blood circulating at any given moment.
  •  In that 5 Liters of Blood a grand total of 1 teaspoon of sugar is available during a fasting state. That’s all the body needs to function.
  •  In 12-ounces of soda or energy drinks typically contain approximately 10 teaspoons of sugar.
  •  That little beverage effectively raises the blood sugar 10 times above what the body needs to function and typically within a matter of minutes.

To Decode the refined sugar in your diet simply do the following wherever refined sugars are listed in the ingredients.

1 Teaspoon of Sugar = Approximately 4 Grams of Sugar

In other words take the total grams of refined sugar and divide by 4 to learn how many teaspoons of sugar you are consuming per serving.

More About Refined Sugar

The Recommended Total Consumption of Refined Sugar & High Fructose Corn Syrup is less than 1 pound per month for Optimal Immune Health. Use the conversions below to assess how much sugar you are consuming each day.

  • 1 teaspoon of Sugar = 4.2 grams = approximately 4 grams
  • 453 grams of Sugar = 1 pound of Sugar
  • 115 teaspoons of Sugar = 1 pound of Sugar
  • 11 Sodas (132 Ounces) = 2, 2-Liter Bottles of Soda =
  • 1 pound of Sugar 1 Soda (12 Ounces) = 39 grams of Sugar = Approximately 10 teaspoons of Sugar
  • 1 Soda (20 Ounces) = 69 grams of Sugar = Approx. 16.5 teaspoons of Sugar
  • 1 Soda (2 Liters) = 67 ounces of Soda = 221 grams of Sugar = ½ pound of Sugar

Drinking 1 Soda (12 Ounces) per day = 30 Sodas per month = 2.65 pounds of Sugar per month from Soda alone = 360 teaspoons of sugar your body will have to use, store or eliminate in order to remain in balance at 1 teaspoon circulating in the blood stream.

I would also say that I would not count fruits, vegetables, and whole grains to this total…just refined sugars like white sugar, brown sugar, high fructose corn syrup, dextrose, dextrin, maltodextrin, agave syrup, maple syrup, and evaporated cane juice.

The US governments projects that average annual refined sugar consumption alone…not counting any other sweetener will be 74 or more pounds per year for the next 20 years. And we wonder why diabetes is the fastest growing pathology in the United States today.

 

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