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Old Label vs. New labeling on food-FDA Announement


Old vs New Label – What’s Different?
While much of the new label’s look isn’t drastically different from the old label, the information and layout have been revamped. According to the FDA’s announcement, the most notable differences between the old and new label include:
* Increasing the type size for “Calories,” “servings per container,” and the “Serving size” declaration, and bolding the number of calories and the “Serving size” declaration to highlight this information.
* Requiring manufacturers to declare the actual amount, in addition to percent Daily Value of vitamin D, calcium, iron and potassium. (They can voluntarily declare the gram amount for other vitamins and minerals.)
* Changing the footnote to better explain what percent Daily Value means. It will read: “*The % Daily Value tells you how much a nutrient in a serving of food contributes to a daily diet. 2,000 calories a day is used for general nutrition advice.”
* Adding the “Added Sugars” declaration directly beneath the listing for “Total Sugars.”
* Removing “Calories from Fat” because research shows the type of fat is more important than the amount.
* Serving sizes must be based on amounts of foods and beverages that people are actually eating, not what they should be eating.

Image source: U.S. Food and Drug Administration
Now that you have a better understanding of the new label, let’s discuss some labeling strategies you can use to meet these label requirements without causing major disruptions to your business.
Label Tips for Manufacturers
Updating your labels can be a pain but with some planning, it can be a much easier process. Below are some suggestions to help you get started on your path to FDA label compliance:
* Mask old info with cover-up labels: Also known as “block out labels,” this unique label material allows you the ability to completely cover up the old Nutrition Facts while continuing to use the last of your label inventory.
* Embrace a new label look: Updating labels with the new Nutrition Facts can be the perfect opportunity to evaluate your current label design and try something new or make improvements.

Gluten-free food labels under new FDA rules

Gluten-free food labels under new FDA rules

* The terms, “gluten free,” “no gluten,” “free of gluten” and “without gluten” can be used on labels of foods that meet the FDA gluten-free standard.
* No universal symbol will appear on packages to indicate that a food meets the FDA gluten-free standard. If a food company wants to indicate that a product meets the standard, it has to use one of the gluten-free terms.
* Certification seals from third parties, for example a seal from the Gluten Free Certification Organization, can continue to be used on labels. The FDA says it does not endorse or recommend any particular certification seal. Any food that uses a third party certification seal must meet the FDA labeling requirements at a minimum. Typically the standards for certification seals are stricter than the FDA requirements.
* The label format is left up to food makers; the FDA does not have a mandated design or any requirements for where the gluten-free label has to be placed.
* Food makers can continue to use the terms, “made with no gluten containing ingredients” and “not made with gluten containing ingredients.” If the terms are used in conjunction with a gluten-free label, the product must meet the FDA standard. If the terms are used without a gluten-free label, the FDA says, “consumers should not assume the food meets all FDA requirements.”
* Food makers can continue to use advisory statements such as, “Made in a factory that also processes wheat products” on a food that also has a gluten-free label. The FDA says it will need to “look at foods on a case by case basis to determine whether a specific advisory statement with a gluten-free claim would be misleading.” Any product with the advisory statement and gluten-free label would have to meet the FDA requirements.
* Naturally gluten-free foods can be labeled gluten free. This is a change from the proposed rules which would have prohibited the gluten-free label on inherently gluten-free foods including gluten-free grains and products like bottled water unless the label also said all foods of the same type were also gluten free. The final rule addresses concerns that some gluten-free grains, legumes and seeds have a high risk of cross-contamination. A gluten-free label on these kinds of products “provide the expectation that any gluten is less than 20 ppm,” the FDA says.
* Gluten-free labeling continues to be voluntary so even products that are gluten free may not be labeled as such. This is likely to come up most often with naturally gluten-free products with a low risk of cross-contamination, fruits and vegetables for example. The lack of a gluten-free label does not mean the food contains gluten.

Fish List – Which Fish to Eat and not to Eat

fish

Environmental Working Group’s

FISH LIST

* Shrimp fishing and farming practices have raised

serious environmental concerns.

** Farmed catfish have low mercury levels but may

contain PCBs in amounts of concern for pregnant women.

AVOID IF PREGNANT:

Shark

Swordfish

King mackerel

Tilefish

Tuna Steaks

Canned tuna

Sea bass

Gulf Coast oysters

Marlin

Halibut

Pike

Walleye

White croaker

Largemouth bass

EAT NO MORE THAN

ONE SERVING PER MONTH:

Mahi mahi

Blue mussel

Eastern oyster

Cod

Pollock

Great Lakes salmon

Gulf Coast blue crab

Channel catfish (wild)**

Lake whitefish

Porgy

Orange Roughy

Snapper

Lake trout

Bluefish

Gontino

Rockfish

 Government studies show that one of every six

pregnant women in the U.S. will give birth to a baby

whose blood is contaminated with mercury at levels

above the federal safety standard. Emitted from

coal-fired power plants and other sources, the pollutant

builds up in some types of seafood. Nutrients in fish

can be vital for a baby’s brain development, but too

much mercury can cause lasting brain damage.

To supplement FDA’s consumer advisories, which don’t

adequately protect the public, EWG evaluated mercury

tests from seven government programs and published

this list to help women choose safer seafood during

pregnancy. This is, in fact, an important guide for everyone,

as mercury poses a risk to the immune system and

heart, even at low levels. For more information, see our

webpage on mercury in seafood at:

http://www.ewg.org/mercury/

More Info about Fish that you should eat

Gluten Free Guide – New Rules under the FDA

Gluten-free food labels under new FDA rules

  • The terms, “gluten free,” “no gluten,” “free of gluten” and “without gluten” can be used on labels of foods that gluten freemeet the FDA gluten-free standard.
  • No universal symbol will appear on packages to indicate that a food meets the FDA gluten-free standard. If a food company wants to indicate that a product meets the standard, it has to use one of the gluten-free terms.
  • Certification seals from third parties, for example a seal from the Gluten Free Certification Organization, can continue to be used on labels. The FDA says it does not endorse or recommend any particular certification seal. Any food that uses a third party certification seal must meet the FDA labeling requirements at a minimum. Typically the standards for certification seals are stricter than the FDA requirements.
  • The label format is left up to food makers; the FDA does not have a mandated design or any requirements for where the gluten-free label has to be placed.
  • Food makers can continue to use the terms, “made with no gluten containing ingredients” and “not made with gluten containing ingredients.” If the terms are used in conjunction with a gluten-free label, the product must meet the FDA standard. If the terms are used without a gluten-free label, the FDA says, “consumers should not assume the food meets all FDA requirements.”
  • Food makers can continue to use advisory statements such as, “Made in a factory that also processes wheat products” on a food that also has a gluten-free label. The FDA says it will need to “look at foods on a case by case basis to determine whether a specific advisory statement with a gluten-free claim would be misleading.” Any product with the advisory statement and gluten-free label would have to meet the FDA requirements.
  • Naturally gluten-free foods can be labeled gluten free. This is a change from the proposed rules which would have prohibited the gluten-free label on inherently gluten-free foods including gluten-free grains and products like bottled water unless the label also said all foods of the same type were also gluten free. The final rule addresses concerns that some gluten-free grains, legumes and seeds have a high risk of cross-contamination. A gluten-free label on these kinds of products “provide the expectation that any gluten is less than 20 ppm,” the FDA says.
  • Gluten-free labeling continues to be voluntary so even products that are gluten free may not be labeled as such. This is likely to come up most often with naturally gluten-free products with a low risk of cross-contamination, fruits and vegetables for example. The lack of a gluten-free label does not mean the food contains gluten.

Fish List – Mercury is Not Your Friend!

fish

Environmental Working Group’s

FISH LIST

* Shrimp fishing and farming practices have raised

serious environmental concerns.

** Farmed catfish have low mercury levels but may

contain PCBs in amounts of concern for pregnant women.

AVOID IF PREGNANT:

Sharkfish

Swordfish

King mackerel

Tilefish

Tuna Steaks

Canned tuna

Sea bass

Gulf Coast oysters

Marlin

Halibut

Pike

Walleye

White croaker

Largemouth bass

EAT NO MORE THAN

ONE SERVING PER MONTH:

Mahi mahi

Blue mussel

Eastern oyster

Cod

Pollock

Great Lakes salmon

Gulf Coast blue crab

Channel catfish (wild)**

Lake whitefish

Porgy

Orange Roughy

Snapper

Lake trout

Bluefish

Gontino

Rockfish

Government studies show that one of every six

pregnant women in the U.S. will give birth to a baby

whose blood is contaminated with mercury at levels

above the federal safety standard. Emitted from

coal-fired power plants and other sources, the pollutant

builds up in some types of seafood. Nutrients in fish

can be vital for a baby’s brain development, but too

much mercury can cause lasting brain damage.

To supplement FDA’s consumer advisories, which don’t

adequately protect the public, EWG evaluated mercury

tests from seven government programs and published

this list to help women choose safer seafood during

pregnancy. This is, in fact, an important guide for everyone,

as mercury poses a risk to the immune system and

heart, even at low levels. For more information, see our

webpage on mercury in seafood at:

http://www.ewg.org/mercury/

Why is Vitamin D So Important? Best Sources of Vitamin D.

eat clean

Vitamin D

Vitamin D is essential to the body.   A few of Best sources of Vitamin D come from shrimp, sardines, cod and eggs. The FDA has set the reference value for nutrition label for vitamin D at 400 IU’s. Therapeutic ranges fall between 400 to 1000 IU’s.

Vitamin D is a fat soluble vitamin, and actually functions more like a hormone then vitamin. It works with the parathyroid hormone to maintain proper levels of calcium in the blood.

We need vitamin D to help our bones and teeth. It also helps regulate the growth and activity of cells. Vitamin D also helps prevent excessive inflammatory immune related activity, it builds your immune system and helps protect against disease.

Vitamin D deficiency results in decreased absorption of calcium and phosphorus. Prolonged deficiency can lead to an impact on your bone mineralization, Thus experiencing bone thinning (osteopenia), bone pain and or soft bones (osteomalacia).

It is estimated that nearly 75% of Americans are deficient in vitamin D1.  For many people, basking in the sun may not be an answer because of skin conditions and sensitivities. Eating oily fish on a regular basis also may not be an option, much of our seafood is over-fished or contaminated from pollution so it can be difficult to find pure sources. Surprisingly, there are several foods packed with vitamin D that are easy to incorporate into your everyday routine.

If you think you’re going to get enough vitamin D from the sun you need to have at least 40% of your skin exposed for at least 15 minutes a day.  Otherwise you will need to get your vitamin D from food and or supplementation.

If you prefer to get your protein vitamins or minerals from a plant-based diet, try mushrooms. 3 ounces portobello mushrooms is 20 cal, 3 g of protein, 1 g dietary fiber, zero cholesterol, 15 mg of sodium, 300 mg of potassium and 4% of your vitamin D for the day.

Other Great Sources of  Vitamin D:

Swiss Chard

Most leafy greens are high in vitamin D, but chard trumps them all.  Add to your omelet or steam with garlic and onions.  Try swiss chart instead of raw Kale in your smoothie and your stomach will thank you for the easier digestion.

Squash and Pumpkin Seeds

Go for Raw and sprouted!My favorite variety of pumpkin seeds are pepitas, the shelled pumpkin seed that has been roasted and sometimes tossed with spices and sea salt.

Beef Liver

Most people remember (not-so-fondly) being forced to eat liver and onions, but beef liver can actually be delicious. Try it in chili or even mix half beef liver and half bison or beef in your favorite meatball recipe.  Organic is SO Important!

Mushrooms

Mushrooms, especially ones grown in sunlight, are very high in vitamin D. Portobello mushrooms are actually considered one of the best vegan sources of vitamin D.3

Caviar

It may not be for everyone and it can be quite expensive, but caviar is also high in vitamin D. If you can’t afford a fresh tin of expensive caviar (which typically isn’t sustainable anyways), try fresh fish roe next time you go out for sushi. Many brands carry organic, sustainably roe at affordable prices.

Almond Milk

While almonds are very high in vitamin D, many people don’t remember to eat a couple handfuls every day. Try buying almond milk instead of dairy.

Chicken Liver

Liver may turn some people off, but they can be so tasty if cooked right. Try it with Black rice, which has sautéed onions, garlic,  peppers, spices and chicken livers.

Dark Chocolate

Good news! Dark chocolate that has over 60% cacao content is packed with vitamin D, so the next time you have a sweet craving, indulge in a few small pieces of high-quality dark chocolate, Organic of course! Look for Cacao not Cocoa.