Struggling with Depression??

Do you struggle with Depression or know someone who does? Tired of being pushed the drug route? Want to heal your body naturally?  Try a few of these herbs.  You  can take them in combinations in tea form or supplement form.  If you need help deciphering what you think you need first, let me help you sort it out before you spend extra money trying to experiement on your own.

Herbs for depression
Rhodiola rosea
Rhodiola rosea (Crassulaceae) is a perennial plant that grows in cold, alpine regions of the Northern Hemisphere. Its roots contain a sap that has long been used to improve physical and mental endurance, relieve symptoms of anxiety and stress, and even lift mood and alleviate depression symptoms. This is why it is considered to be an adaptogen, a natural substance that helps normalize the body’s response to stress, and maintain optimal homeostasis by balancing the immune system and endocrine hormones (http://cms.herbalgram.org/herbclip/342/review45139.html).

Numerous scientific studies, including research conducted and compiled by Dr. Zakir Ramazanov, a former Soviet soldier-turned-doctor, has revealed that rhodiola rosea can be safely used to reduce recovery time after workouts, improve attention span and memory, improve physical fitness and performance, enhance psychomotor function, and alleviate depression and anxiety (http://rhodiolarosea.org/rhodiola-benefits/).
100mg of Rhodila a day (Dr.Weil.com)

Learn more: http://www.naturalnews.com/035463_depression_herbs_remedies.html#ixzz3zjQgnxzR

St. John’s Wort
St. John’s Wort (Hypericum perforatum), a plant native to temperate and subtropical regions of the world, has long been used in many cultures to treat depression. Numerous research studies, including a 2008 study published as part of the Cochrane Systematic Review, have found that St. John’s Wort is at least as effective as standard antidepressant drugs at treating mild to moderate depressive disorders, but with few potentially harmful side effects (http://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2008/10/081007192435.htm).

When taken as a whole extract, St. John’s Wort has also been shown to help naturally alleviate sleep disorders, promote relaxation, and boost energy levels in such a way that avoids the “spikes” and “plunges” typically associated with consumption of caffeine and other stimulants. St. John’s Wort is considered to be a safe, inexpensive herbal remedy that can help promote improved overall mental health.

Learn more: http://www.naturalnews.com/035463_depression_herbs_remedies.html#ixzz3zjSFGRPF

Camu Camu
Camu Camu (Myrciaria dubia) is a tropical rainforest plant whose berries have the highest known levels of natural vitamin C in the world. The plant’s fruit, which is naturally tangy and sweet, contains a host of nutrients, including vitamin C, that fight the negative effects of the herpes virus, promote immune health, alleviate inflammation, and fight bacteria and viruses. Camu Camu also has adaptogenic properties that normalize bodily processes during stress, and help relieve symptoms of depression.

In his Clinician’s Handbook of Natural Healing, Dr. Gary Null, Ph.D., critically-acclaimed nutritionist and researcher, lists Camu Camu as the second most potent known plant for containing natural antidepressant compounds — and best of all, eating camu camu has absolutely no know negative side effects
Therapeutic Ranges for Vit C falls between 3000-5000mg day

Learn more: http://www.naturalnews.com/035463_depression_herbs_remedies.html#ixzz3zjSTNQ4d

Ashwagandha
Ashwagandha (Withania somnifera), an Indian plant that has long been used in Ayurvedic medicine, contains powerful adaptogenic compounds that are known to relieve symptoms of anxiety and depression. The plant is also known to help fight degenerative brain conditions like Alzheimer’s and Parkinson’s, as well as inhibit the growth and spread of cancer cells.

Several studies, including one published in the journal Phytomedicine back in 2000, have found that ashwagandha works as well as, or better than, antidepressant drugs at relieving anxiety and treating depression symptoms. And ashwagandha naturally prevents stress-induced free radical damage without causing harmful side effects (http://www.lef.org/magazine/mag2006/jun2006_report_ashwa_01.htm).
Ashwaganda can be up to 6000mg a day, suggesting to be taken in 3 doses divided.

Learn more: http://www.naturalnews.com/035463_depression_herbs_remedies.html#ixzz3zjSWnAz2

Maca
Maca (Lepidium meyenii), also known as “Peruvian ginseng,” is a root vegetable that is packed with amino acids, phytonutrients, vitamins, and minerals. Like the other herbs mentioned, it has long been used in traditional medicine to increase energy and stamina, enhance libido, and boost the immune, adrenal, and endocrine systems.

In a 2008 study published in the journal Menopause, researchers found that maca helps reduce anxiety and depression symptoms in women with menopause (http://drtorihudson.com). And in a 2006 study published in the journal BMC Complementary and Alternative Medicine, researchers found that maca clearly exhibits general antidepressant activity in all people when consumed.
Maca can be 500-2000mg a day. (macaextract.net)
Learn more: http://www.naturalnews.com/035463_depression_herbs_remedies.html#ixzz3zjSfMG5m

Aminolase: Protein Nutrition

PROTEIN NUTRITION
Aminolase. Arthur Andrew Medical
30 capsules $24.99
90 capsules $69.99

Worth every penny for anyone “training” and not just “working out!”

Ideal for body builders, runners, fitness enthusiasts, or anyone with an active lifestyle, Aminolase represents a breakthrough in protein nutrition for those using protein supplements or meal replacements to help build or maintain healthy muscle mass and accelerate muscle recovery. Aminolase should be taken with protein rich foods and all protein supplements including the following: whey, milk, casein, soy, pea, rice and hemp. Protein supplements are one of the richest sources of all nine essential amino acids that the body is unable to produce on its own; however all protein must first be processed into a usable form, which includes essential amino acids and beneficial peptides (i.e., Di and Tri-peptides). To be effective, protein must be broken down into a smaller particle size within approximately 90 minutes of consumption. This transit time represents the time from which protein passes from the stomach through the small intestine where digestion/absorption primarily occurs; from there it will be assembled into muscle building protein (a bio-usable form). Undigested protein will simply be excreted from the body, resulting in increased kidney stress and wasted amino acids, essentially pouring your expensive protein supplement down the toilet.*

Servings Per Container: 30
Consume 1 capsule of Aminolase™ per 25 grams of protein. Aminolase capsules may also be opened and added directly to your favorite protein supplement, or taken with any protein rich meal.

Serving Size: 1 capsule
Amount Per Serving:
Aminolase TPA™ … 250mg
Acid Stable Protease Blend
Other Ingredients: Cellulose (vegetarian capsules)
Aminolase is free of dairy, gluten, and soy allergens. Contains no artificial colors or preservatives.

How Much Sugar – Can You Have? Did You Have? Should You Have? How to Calculate it.

sugar

How Much Sugar is Too Much?

Calculating Refined Sugar Intake In Teaspoons sugar

  • A healthy adult human being has approximately 5 liters of blood circulating at any given moment.
  •  In that 5 Liters of Blood a grand total of 1 teaspoon of sugar is available during a fasting state. That’s all the body needs to function.
  •  In 12-ounces of soda or energy drinks typically contain approximately 10 teaspoons of sugar.
  •  That little beverage effectively raises the blood sugar 10 times above what the body needs to function and typically within a matter of minutes.

To Decode the refined sugar in your diet simply do the following wherever refined sugars are listed in the ingredients.

1 Teaspoon of Sugar = Approximately 4 Grams of Sugar

In other words take the total grams of refined sugar and divide by 4 to learn how many teaspoons of sugar you are consuming per serving.

More About Refined Sugar

The Recommended Total Consumption of Refined Sugar & High Fructose Corn Syrup is less than 1 pound per month for Optimal Immune Health. Use the conversions below to assess how much sugar you are consuming each day.

  • 1 teaspoon of Sugar = 4.2 grams = approximately 4 grams
  • 453 grams of Sugar = 1 pound of Sugar
  • 115 teaspoons of Sugar = 1 pound of Sugar
  • 11 Sodas (132 Ounces) = 2, 2-Liter Bottles of Soda =
  • 1 pound of Sugar 1 Soda (12 Ounces) = 39 grams of Sugar = Approximately 10 teaspoons of Sugar
  • 1 Soda (20 Ounces) = 69 grams of Sugar = Approx. 16.5 teaspoons of Sugar
  • 1 Soda (2 Liters) = 67 ounces of Soda = 221 grams of Sugar = ½ pound of Sugar

Drinking 1 Soda (12 Ounces) per day = 30 Sodas per month = 2.65 pounds of Sugar per month from Soda alone = 360 teaspoons of sugar your body will have to use, store or eliminate in order to remain in balance at 1 teaspoon circulating in the blood stream.

I would also say that I would not count fruits, vegetables, and whole grains to this total…just refined sugars like white sugar, brown sugar, high fructose corn syrup, dextrose, dextrin, maltodextrin, agave syrup, maple syrup, and evaporated cane juice.

The US governments projects that average annual refined sugar consumption alone…not counting any other sweetener will be 74 or more pounds per year for the next 20 years. And we wonder why diabetes is the fastest growing pathology in the United States today.

 

See Related Articles

Hot mess: The grossest health concerns of summer

 

(CNN)You are not the only one who thrives in the summer and loves its warm, long days. Bacteria and other microbes that cause food poisoning, diarrhea and just general grossness also flourish, threatening to make it a season to be sick.

“Foodborne pathogens follow an annual cycle, and we tend to see peaks of them, especially bacteria, in the summer, at picnics, potlucks and all the outdoor events,” said Melinda Wilkins, director of the online science master’s program in food safety at Michigan State University.
Your gut is not the only part of your body at risk of assault by bacteria such as E. coli in summer months. Bugs lurk in air conditioning filters, especially when it is hot and humid, ready to cause trouble for those with breathing problems. And the skin that protects you from infections can become a portal for them after a bad, blistering sunburn.
Of course, even if some dangers await you at the picnic, pool or beach, it is worth it to get out and enjoy yourself. You can most likely handle what comes your way.

Don’t pee (or poop) in the pool

The burn you feel in your eyes after a dip in the swimming pool is not because of chlorine. It is because pee, poop and sweat from fellow swimmers (and maybe you) react with chlorine and form chloramine compounds,and this combination is what really stings your peepers. Aside from the gross factor, the formation of these compounds means there is less chlorine left in the water to kill bacteria, such as E. coli. Chloramines can also irritate the airways, and when they build up in the air, such as at indoor pools, they can trigger asthma attacks.
“We recommend that you not pee or poop in the water, and shower before you go in,” said Michele Hlavsa, chief of the Health Swimming Program at the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. A 2010 CDC report found that one out of 10 public pools don’t have proper chlorine levels. To make sure you’re not about to take a dip in a bacteria-laden pool, “you can use pool test strips at a pool supply or big box store” to check the chlorine level, Hlavsa said. (The CDC recommends chlorine levels in pools between 1 and 3 parts per million and pH of 7.2 to 7.8.)
Even at the right levels, chlorine does not wipe out everything. A new CDC report found that a parasite called cryptosporidium, which can cause diarrhea and lives up to 10 days in a chlorinated pool, was associated with 37 (54%) of the 69 outbreaks of illness at pools and water parks. “To protect yourself, it’s about not swallowing the water you swim in, and to protect others don’t swim if you have diarrhea,” Hlavsa said.

Lurking in seawater

A day at the beach may leave you with more memories than you imagined if you go home with vibriosis. The infection is caused by vibrio bacteria, which live in some coastal waters and flourish in the warm months between May and October, when the majority of cases occur.
According to the CDC, there are about 80,000 cases each year, and about 100 of them are fatal.
An estimated 52,000 of those cases result from eating contaminated food, such as raw oysters, that have been infected in the water they once lived in. Symptoms usually begin within 24 hours of consumption. They include abdominal pain, diarrhea, nausea, vomiting, fever and chills. The illness lasts about three days.
The bacteria can also cause skin rashes that lead to infection when contaminated water gets into an open wound or even a scratch.
The best way to prevent this infection is to thoroughly cook shellfish and clean hands well after touching raw or undercooked shellfish. Cuts or scrapes should be cleaned well with soap after contact with infected water. When possible, cover the wound with a waterproof bandage before getting it wet.

Beware the picnic burgers

The thought of potato salad sweltering in the heat at the summer picnic may make the burgers on the grill sound pretty appetizing, but think again. “Actually, potato salad has kind of a bad rap, but it is not really a particularly high-risk food,” said Wilkins, of Michigan State University. “But people tend to bring frozen (burger) patties and throw them on the grill before they are fully thawed, (and) ground meat that is not thoroughly cooked is one of the riskiest items” because it can have E. coli, she said.
Ground beef and pork should be cooked to 160 degrees Fahrenheit, ground chicken and turkey to 165 degrees. And yes, that means using a meat thermometer to test the temperature in the middle of the burger, Wilkins said.
Of course, bacteria can still lurk in a big bowl of gooey potato or pasta salad, but not for the reasons you may think. Ingredients such as potatoes, pasta and eggs, not the mayonnaise, are prone to contamination. To play it safe, keep containers of anything you’re supposed to eat cold, such as potato salad, in big bowls or coolers full of ice, Wilkins said.

Bacteria scream for ice cream (machines)

An issue that can plague many an inadequately cleaned soft-serve ice cream dispenser is bacteria. “Listeria (bacteria) is a really sneaky pathogen in that it likes to live in cooler temperatures and populate machinery,” Wilkins said. Listeria infections can cause fever and muscle aches, and they are especially dangerous for pregnant women, who may miscarry as a result.
On the bright side, the Blue Bell ice cream scare has made people more aware of listeria’s potential to lurk in frozen desserts, Wilkins said. It is a good idea to ask the person working at the yogurt shop or ice cream truck when the machines were last cleaned. “It brings the issue to the awareness of the workers and management to double check their procedures,” Wilkins said.

Burn, baby, burn

Sunburns may seem like a sweet souvenir from a day at the beach, but they should really be thought of as potentially harmful wounds. In the most severe cases, people can develop blisters and need to be treated like burn victims, said Dr. Cameron K. Rokhsar, assistant clinical professor of dermatology at the Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai. “The skin sloughs off, (and) if there’s any kind of raw wound, it can predispose you to an infection” and should be treated with a prescription antibiotic ointment, he said.
Worse yet, even just a few serious sunburns may greatly increase your risk of developing skin cancer. A 2014 study found that white women who had five or more blistering sunburns when they were teens were 68% more likely to develop melanoma, the deadliest form of skin cancer.

Brush with jellyfish

Despite that old episode of “Friends” where Joey peed on Monica’s jellyfish sting, urine is not the antidote to the venom of this goopy animal, which is common off beaches across the United States and thrives in warm water. Rinsing the wound with saltwater is one of the most recommended ways to relieve the stinging, redness and swelling that follow a brush with a jellyfish tentacle.
A more surprising but also effective treatment is vinegar, said Rokhsar, who knows firsthand that it can make the pain go away almost instantaneously. “It happened to me. It hurts a lot, and I actually went to the lifeguard station, and they had vinegar spray,” he said.
Also beware of the not-so-cute baby jellyfish called sea lice. Unlike the adults’ sting, theirs doesn’t hurt, so you don’t have to worry about rinsing the wound with saltwater or vinegar. Save the vinegar for rinsing your swimsuit before you wash it. Some believe the larvae can become trapped in the fabric.
You will usually experience an itchy, red rash and small blisters within 24 hours. The rash is sometimes accompanied with fever, chills, headaches and nausea. The symptoms can last as long as two weeks and are not contagious.
The sea lice, which are actually microscopic larvae of marine life such as jellyfish or sea anemones, are most often found in summer waters in Florida and the Caribbean.

Grossness flourishes in air conditioning filters

When air conditioners are working around the clock in hot summer months, dust, mold and pollution from outdoor air (in the case of central AC) or indoor air (in the case of a window unit) tend to build up on the filter of AC units. Not only does this slash the air conditioner’s efficiency, it can also carry health risks, said Abby Brokaw, director of the American Lung Association of the Upper Midwest Health House program.
“People who are already having problems with breathing or lung health — so people with allergies or respiratory disease — are going to be affected” if the filter is not properly cleaned, removing dust, mold, dander and other detritus, Brokaw said.
To keep your filter in tiptop shape, clean or replace it every three months, Brokaw advised. But take precaution when you do. Mold and bacteria love to grow on filters, especially in the summer humidity.
“You don’t want to breathe in mold spores and bacteria. We would recommend that you wear gloves and a mask,” Brokaw said, referring to surgical masks sold in drugstores.

Read more: http://www.cnn.com/2015/06/26/health/gross-summer-health/index.html